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Original Metallic C-Print - signed and numbered on a limited Edition of 7 (with certificate of authenticity)- Framed in shadow box white maple wood and museum glass

--------------------------------

To create this series of photographs, Badessi came up with a technique that addresses some of the fascinating laws of physics that involve the reflection of light. This project allowed him also to approach the color theory on a unique way and to work with one of his preferred tools: symbolism. 

What makes the INNOCENCE series so unique is the fact that Badessi managed to exploit, with great relevance, the two main characteristics of the photography medium: the capturing of time in a fraction of a second and the use of light.

When creating these images he was even able to provoke some type of solarization. A very interesting photographic phenomenon based with light, which is primarily experienced when making a print in the darkroom. Using a technique that he will not disclose, Badessi managed to obtain this effect directly when taking the photographs and not when printing.

Badessi noticed that, once crunched, aluminum foil would reflect colors very intensely, like a mirror. To dedicate a new project based on the “fragility of life”—a subject that he had studied previously in the series American Dream, this is not a dream (2006)—he decided to use the above observation along with butterflies as the main symbolic element. 

Badessi created large-scale sculptures made of aluminum foil and applied stunning combinations of colors, using a method based on the reflection of light. The colors reflected vividly onto the aluminum and blended beautifully. Once satisfied by a specific combination of colors, Badessi froze the moment with his camera. This process enabled him to produce unique pieces that could only be captured once because any little movement of the panels would instantly change the physical aspect of the sculptures. 

He did not use Photoshop or projections of colored lights onto the sculptures to obtain these amazing colors and compositions. Instead, he relied on the natural physical reaction of light onto the reflective surface. Using this method he was able to obtain endless combinations of colors and shapes, as if he was a sculptor and a painter at the same time. 

Technically, the photographs were captured with an analog camera so, when looked at up-close, the viewers would be able to appreciate on the prints the beautiful grain of the film. Pixilation would also be avoided, for large-scale format prints.
Original Metallic C-Print - signed and numbered on a limited Edition of 7 (with certificate of authenticity)- Framed in shadow box white maple wood and museum glass

--------------------------------

To create this series of photographs, Badessi came up with a technique that addresses some of the fascinating laws of physics that involve the reflection of light. This project allowed him also to approach the color theory on a unique way and to work with one of his preferred tools: symbolism. 

What makes the INNOCENCE series so unique is the fact that Badessi managed to exploit, with great relevance, the two main characteristics of the photography medium: the capturing of time in a fraction of a second and the use of light.

When creating these images he was even able to provoke some type of solarization. A very interesting photographic phenomenon based with light, which is primarily experienced when making a print in the darkroom. Using a technique that he will not disclose, Badessi managed to obtain this effect directly when taking the photographs and not when printing.

Badessi noticed that, once crunched, aluminum foil would reflect colors very intensely, like a mirror. To dedicate a new project based on the “fragility of life”—a subject that he had studied previously in the series American Dream, this is not a dream (2006)—he decided to use the above observation along with butterflies as the main symbolic element. 

Badessi created large-scale sculptures made of aluminum foil and applied stunning combinations of colors, using a method based on the reflection of light. The colors reflected vividly onto the aluminum and blended beautifully. Once satisfied by a specific combination of colors, Badessi froze the moment with his camera. This process enabled him to produce unique pieces that could only be captured once because any little movement of the panels would instantly change the physical aspect of the sculptures. 

He did not use Photoshop or projections of colored lights onto the sculptures to obtain these amazing colors and compositions. Instead, he relied on the natural physical reaction of light onto the reflective surface. Using this method he was able to obtain endless combinations of colors and shapes, as if he was a sculptor and a painter at the same time. 

Technically, the photographs were captured with an analog camera so, when looked at up-close, the viewers would be able to appreciate on the prints the beautiful grain of the film. Pixilation would also be avoided, for large-scale format prints.
Original Metallic C-Print - signed and numbered on a limited Edition of 7 (with certificate of authenticity)- Framed in shadow box white maple wood and museum glass

--------------------------------

To create this series of photographs, Badessi came up with a technique that addresses some of the fascinating laws of physics that involve the reflection of light. This project allowed him also to approach the color theory on a unique way and to work with one of his preferred tools: symbolism. 

What makes the INNOCENCE series so unique is the fact that Badessi managed to exploit, with great relevance, the two main characteristics of the photography medium: the capturing of time in a fraction of a second and the use of light.

When creating these images he was even able to provoke some type of solarization. A very interesting photographic phenomenon based with light, which is primarily experienced when making a print in the darkroom. Using a technique that he will not disclose, Badessi managed to obtain this effect directly when taking the photographs and not when printing.

Badessi noticed that, once crunched, aluminum foil would reflect colors very intensely, like a mirror. To dedicate a new project based on the “fragility of life”—a subject that he had studied previously in the series American Dream, this is not a dream (2006)—he decided to use the above observation along with butterflies as the main symbolic element. 

Badessi created large-scale sculptures made of aluminum foil and applied stunning combinations of colors, using a method based on the reflection of light. The colors reflected vividly onto the aluminum and blended beautifully. Once satisfied by a specific combination of colors, Badessi froze the moment with his camera. This process enabled him to produce unique pieces that could only be captured once because any little movement of the panels would instantly change the physical aspect of the sculptures. 

He did not use Photoshop or projections of colored lights onto the sculptures to obtain these amazing colors and compositions. Instead, he relied on the natural physical reaction of light onto the reflective surface. Using this method he was able to obtain endless combinations of colors and shapes, as if he was a sculptor and a painter at the same time. 

Technically, the photographs were captured with an analog camera so, when looked at up-close, the viewers would be able to appreciate on the prints the beautiful grain of the film. Pixilation would also be avoided, for large-scale format prints.
Original Metallic C-Print - signed and numbered on a limited Edition of 7 (with certificate of authenticity)- Framed in shadow box white maple wood and museum glass

--------------------------------

To create this series of photographs, Badessi came up with a technique that addresses some of the fascinating laws of physics that involve the reflection of light. This project allowed him also to approach the color theory on a unique way and to work with one of his preferred tools: symbolism. 

What makes the INNOCENCE series so unique is the fact that Badessi managed to exploit, with great relevance, the two main characteristics of the photography medium: the capturing of time in a fraction of a second and the use of light.

When creating these images he was even able to provoke some type of solarization. A very interesting photographic phenomenon based with light, which is primarily experienced when making a print in the darkroom. Using a technique that he will not disclose, Badessi managed to obtain this effect directly when taking the photographs and not when printing.

Badessi noticed that, once crunched, aluminum foil would reflect colors very intensely, like a mirror. To dedicate a new project based on the “fragility of life”—a subject that he had studied previously in the series American Dream, this is not a dream (2006)—he decided to use the above observation along with butterflies as the main symbolic element. 

Badessi created large-scale sculptures made of aluminum foil and applied stunning combinations of colors, using a method based on the reflection of light. The colors reflected vividly onto the aluminum and blended beautifully. Once satisfied by a specific combination of colors, Badessi froze the moment with his camera. This process enabled him to produce unique pieces that could only be captured once because any little movement of the panels would instantly change the physical aspect of the sculptures. 

He did not use Photoshop or projections of colored lights onto the sculptures to obtain these amazing colors and compositions. Instead, he relied on the natural physical reaction of light onto the reflective surface. Using this method he was able to obtain endless combinations of colors and shapes, as if he was a sculptor and a painter at the same time. 

Technically, the photographs were captured with an analog camera so, when looked at up-close, the viewers would be able to appreciate on the prints the beautiful grain of the film. Pixilation would also be avoided, for large-scale format prints.
Original Metallic C-Print - signed and numbered on a limited Edition of 7 (with certificate of authenticity)- Framed in shadow box white maple wood and museum glass

--------------------------------

To create this series of photographs, Badessi came up with a technique that addresses some of the fascinating laws of physics that involve the reflection of light. This project allowed him also to approach the color theory on a unique way and to work with one of his preferred tools: symbolism. 

What makes the INNOCENCE series so unique is the fact that Badessi managed to exploit, with great relevance, the two main characteristics of the photography medium: the capturing of time in a fraction of a second and the use of light.

When creating these images he was even able to provoke some type of solarization. A very interesting photographic phenomenon based with light, which is primarily experienced when making a print in the darkroom. Using a technique that he will not disclose, Badessi managed to obtain this effect directly when taking the photographs and not when printing.

Badessi noticed that, once crunched, aluminum foil would reflect colors very intensely, like a mirror. To dedicate a new project based on the “fragility of life”—a subject that he had studied previously in the series American Dream, this is not a dream (2006)—he decided to use the above observation along with butterflies as the main symbolic element. 

Badessi created large-scale sculptures made of aluminum foil and applied stunning combinations of colors, using a method based on the reflection of light. The colors reflected vividly onto the aluminum and blended beautifully. Once satisfied by a specific combination of colors, Badessi froze the moment with his camera. This process enabled him to produce unique pieces that could only be captured once because any little movement of the panels would instantly change the physical aspect of the sculptures. 

He did not use Photoshop or projections of colored lights onto the sculptures to obtain these amazing colors and compositions. Instead, he relied on the natural physical reaction of light onto the reflective surface. Using this method he was able to obtain endless combinations of colors and shapes, as if he was a sculptor and a painter at the same time. 

Technically, the photographs were captured with an analog camera so, when looked at up-close, the viewers would be able to appreciate on the prints the beautiful grain of the film. Pixilation would also be avoided, for large-scale format prints.

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Innocence #1, New York 2009-2012 Photograph

Laurent Elie Badessi

United States

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Size: 45 W x 50 H x 2 D in

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About The Artwork

Original Metallic C-Print - signed and numbered on a limited Edition of 7 (with certificate of authenticity)- Framed in shadow box white maple wood and museum glass -------------------------------- To create this series of photographs, Badessi came up with a technique that addresses some of the fascinating laws of physics that involve the reflection of light. This project allowed him also to approach the color theory on a unique way and to work with one of his preferred tools: symbolism. What makes the INNOCENCE series so unique is the fact that Badessi managed to exploit, with great relevance, the two main characteristics of the photography medium: the capturing of time in a fraction of a second and the use of light. When creating these images he was even able to provoke some type of solarization. A very interesting photographic phenomenon based with light, which is primarily experienced when making a print in the darkroom. Using a technique that he will not disclose, Badessi managed to obtain this effect directly when taking the photographs and not when printing. Badessi noticed that, once crunched, aluminum foil would reflect colors very intensely, like a mirror. To dedicate a new project based on the “fragility of life”—a subject that he had studied previously in the series American Dream, this is not a dream (2006)—he decided to use the above observation along with butterflies as the main symbolic element. Badessi created large-scale sculptures made of aluminum foil and applied stunning combinations of colors, using a method based on the reflection of light. The colors reflected vividly onto the aluminum and blended beautifully. Once satisfied by a specific combination of colors, Badessi froze the moment with his camera. This process enabled him to produce unique pieces that could only be captured once because any little movement of the panels would instantly change the physical aspect of the sculptures. He did not use Photoshop or projections of colored lights onto the sculptures to obtain these amazing colors and compositions. Instead, he relied on the natural physical reaction of light onto the reflective surface. Using this method he was able to obtain endless combinations of colors and shapes, as if he was a sculptor and a painter at the same time. Technically, the photographs were captured with an analog camera so, when looked at up-close, the viewers would be able to appreciate on the prints the beautiful grain of the film. Pixilation would also be avoided, for large-scale format prints.

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Photography:C-type on Aluminium

Original:One-of-a-kind Artwork

Size:45 W x 50 H x 2 D in

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Laurent Elie Badessi is a Franco American fine art photographer born in France. He belongs to a family with three generations of photographers. From an early age, this enabled him to explore and appreciate the art of photography. After studying language and communication sciences at Université des Lettres d’Avignon, Badessi enrolled in a photography course at Université de Paris VIII. Curious about the psychological aspect in the interaction that occurs between a photographer and his sitter during a photo session, he decided to base his M.A. thesis on that subject. To explore this phenomenon further, he used the technique of “La photographie négociée” (The Negotiated Photography) and spent several months in Niger, Africa taking photographs of isolated tribes that had never (or very rarely) been exposed to the medium. For this project titled “Ethnological Fashion Photography”, he received the prominent “Bourse de l’aventure” (The Adventure Grant) among several other grants and awards. Badessi started his career in Paris and continued working abroad before moving to the United States in the early 1990s. After spending ten years focusing on the human figure, Badessi’s work SKIN, which was compiled in a book of the same name, was internationally released in early 2000 by the prestigious Swiss publisher Edition Stemmle. The book contains introduction by Sondra Gilman, Founder and Chairperson of the photography committee at the Whitney Museum. In 2004, Badessi was chosen by the company Charles Jourdan to produce a series of photographs for their advertising campaign. Because of the emblematic relationship between the medium of photography and this brand, Badessi accepted the project. Like photographer Guy Bourdin, who helped build that relationship thanks to his iconic images, Badessi was also given carte blanche. To bring his own vision to life, he played with fetishism and mythological symbolism. He created memorable visuals that are in the permanent collection of Le Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, Louvre. At the peak of the American war in Iraq, Badessi created American Dream, This is not a dream (2006), a powerful series of portraits based on the propagandist campaigns elaborated by the army to attract new recruits during the war. In 2011 American Dream, This is not a dream was selected for the prestigious “Arte Laguna Prize” and shown at the Venice Arsenale. Innocence (2009-Present) and Dreaming Marilyns (2012-13) followed.

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