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301 MOVED PERMANENTLY - Limited Edition of 10
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301 MOVED PERMANENTLY - Limited Edition of 10 Print

Nadia Jaber

Spain

Printmaking, Digital on Paper

Size: 19 W x 27 H x 0.1 D in

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About The Artwork

Nadia Jaber’s paintings jump around, scrolling between textures, flipping tabs into new color palettes and stretching materiality. She riffs between styles and ideas, cutting and scratching them like a DJ would, to curate something entirely new. The eyes and mind can keep up of course, because we’re used to this hyperactive image intake - we do it all day, every day on our phones. “about:blank” is Nadia’s series reflecting not just on our visual ADHD but on what the mysterious machines behind social media are making us want, or think we want, and what that means for art appreciation. How about the artist as a postdigitalist algorithm, an online magpie curating a found line, shape, and color to generate an analogue version of the digital stream of information. Nadia’s work is a full-scale rebellion against the smoke and mirrors of social media, the artwork makes the virtual vibrant. Nadia takes an old-fashioned needle and neatly sews it all together. The work is generative in that it’s a remix of some other artworks. Its narrative structure is set up to tell a new story every time you see it, depending on where you start. 301 Moved Permanently A "301 Moved Permanently" HTTP error code indicates that the resource requested has been definitively moved to the URL given by the location headers. This painting reflects on the idea of how nature and species have been removed from their habitats by the exploitation done by humans. As the error code, the resource has been definitely moved or removed from its original location or habitat. The festive imaginary of the painting is a metaphor for the use of animals and nature as a human commodity, the words “LILY” are meant to be read in combination with the tiger, creating the character “TIGER LILY” referring to the princess of the "Piccaninny-tribe" (Native Americans) living on the island of Neverland that appears on J. M. Barrie's play Peter Pan. In ancient Greek religion and mythology, Pan is the god of the wild, shepherds and flocks, nature of mountain wilds, rustic music and impromptus, and companion of the nymphs. He has the hindquarters, legs, and horns of a goat, in the same manner as a faun or satyr. The bottom right side corner of the painting recreates a Greek motif, that it is referring to the PAN mythology meaning of this word. The title of the artworks comes from HTTP status response codes. The codes are standard response codes given by website servers and are sometimes called internet error codes. Naming the paintings with these codes I wanted to create a bond between them and the conceptualization of these series. As the code that titles these series “about:blank” displays a blank page when the browser has nothing else to show, the title of each painting is named after a different response code given by a website when an error happens. Limited edition of 10 giclée prints on 308gsm Hahnemühle Fine Art Satin cotton rag paper. Please note it does not come framed.

Details & Dimensions

Print:Digital on Paper

Artist Produced Limited Edition of:5

Size:19 W x 27 H x 0.1 D in

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Delivery Time:Typically 5-7 business days for domestic shipments, 10-14 business days for international shipments.

Artist Nadia Jaber (Spanish, b. 1986) channels the artist as a postdigital algorithm, an online magpie curating a found line, shape, and color to generate an analog version of the digital stream of information. Nadia’s work reflects not just on our visual ADHD but on what the mysterious machines behind social media are making us want, or think we want, and what that means for art appreciation. Her work has been featured in “15 Emerging Female Artists To Invest in Before They Blow Up” selected by Saatchi Art Head Curator Rebecca Wilson, and her paintings have been included in interior design projects featured in AD Spain Magazine. She has participated in the Other Art Fair by Saatchi Art in NY and had a solo show in LA. Also had participated in Art Fairs in Madrid and Mallorca. Nadia Jaber’s paintings jump around, scrolling between textures, flipping tabs into new color palettes and stretching materiality. She riffs between styles and ideas, cutting and scratching them like a DJ would, to curate something entirely new. The eyes and mind can keep up of course, because we’re used to this hyperactive image intake - we do it all day, every day on our phones. Nadia’s work is a full-scale rebellion against the smoke and mirrors of social media, the ultimate collage of the current algorithmic syncretism and acknowledges not only Nadia’s belonging to the digital art revolution, but points rather gratefully to Art’s ultimate dimension, its digital kingdom, where artists thrive, collect, exchange, buy, sell, and perhaps, more definitely, find inspiration and half live. Nobody with their wits about them would question that the art world is increasingly virtual and that its health hasn’t been better in decades. So the question here prays: are technologies to blame or to praise? Andy Warhol, one of the most accomplished ambassadors of appropriation, was ecstatic after discovering the wonders of silk-screening. In one of the fewest interviews available online —omnipotent technology in full bloom— Warhol told to Art News’s reporter Gene Swenson a rather legendary line: «I think everybody should be a machine. I think everybody should like everybody». It was 1962. Warhol anticipated not only the behavior of today’s technologies but the ultimate lust of artists like Nadia, who are openly challenging themselves to become precisely that same technology.

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