MAGIC PORTAL, SAINT CLEMENT’S, PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA, US Art Print by Jerry DiFalco - Limited Edition of 10

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MAGIC PORTAL, SAINT CLEMENT’S, PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA, US - Limited Edition of 10

Jerry DiFalco

United States

Printmaking

Size: 16 W x 20 H x 1 D in

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About The Artwork

Title: MAGIC PORTAL, SAINT CLEMENT’S IN PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA, US I used one zinc plate (eight-inches wide by ten inches high; 20.32cm by 25.40cm) to create this work, which is the overall size of the image; the print measures 14 inches wide by 15 inches high (about 36cm x 38.1cm). Media include a blend of oil-based inks on Stonehenge paper (color-fawn). THIS PRICE INCLUDES: THE MATTED ETCHING IN AN ARCHIVAL MAT; A FRAME (16 inch x 20 inch, Type – Glass & Wood Edge / Semi-Ornate Style, Color - Gold); ALL HANDLING COSTS; SHIPMENT COSTS; CARDBOARD SHIPMENT CARTON; BUBBLE WRAP & OTHER PACKING MATERIALS; AND, A CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY. The work is wired and ready to hang. Framing includes a brown craft paper backing. A wall hook and nail are included. NOTES: St Clement’s Anglican Catholic church, located on the South west corner of 20th and Cherry Streets, was designed by the distinguished Philadelphia architect John Notman (who also designed St. Mark’s Church on Locust Street and the Church of the Holy Trinity on Rittenhouse Square. Notman collaborated with Napoleon Le Brun, an associate architect for the Philadelphia Roman Catholic Cathedral of SS. Peter and Paul on Logan Square. St. Clement’s was built entirely of brownstone. Mostly fields surrounded the church when the cornerstone was laid in 1861. Few houses existed nearby, and large open lots encircled the ground that had been secured for the church. The city's grid of streets had hardly expanded westward as far as 20th Street, and there was no City Hall in the Center Square. The Pennsylvania Railroad Terminal was located at 11th and Market Streets, and there was a covered wooden bridge over the Schuylkill River. The Civil War Era Church was consecrated on April 12, 1864, after three years of construction. St. Clement’s is a mystical place and is noted for both it’s ‘Lady Chapel” and “The Shrine of Our Lady of Clemency”. The later was consecrated in March 1943 and designed by Wilfred Anthony, a renowned New York architect. The woodwork was built by the Mastery Wood Craft Co. of New York, with Henry Beretta as the sculptor. Robert Robbins did the gilding and painting. Our Lady is shown “clothed with the sun, the moon under her feet, and on her head a crown of twelve stars,” as S. John was privileged to see her in Heaven (Revelation 12.1). The Goddess-like figure of Mary stands six feet in height and rests on a polychromed pedestal of octagonal build. Two hand wrought candle rings, made by the Ferro Studios of New York surround the base. From behind the figure, highly burnished rays of glory radiate in the shape of a great vesica. Above the statue is a deep valance of delicate wood carving, gilded and painted in mediæval Gothic colours, and surmounted by a tall spire of open woodwork. The overall height of the Shrine is approximately twenty-five feet. During festal seasons, the image is clothed in antique lace and a white damask mantle. Saint Clement's is an Anglican Church (Episcopal) in the High Tradition.

Details & Dimensions

Print:Aquatint on Paper

Artist Produced Limited Edition of:10

Size:16 W x 20 H x 1 D in

Shipping & Returns

Delivery Time:Typically 5-7 business days for domestic shipments, 10-14 business days for international shipments.

Imagery and storyline—both vital components of my creative process—enable me to create a form of visual poetry. Consequently, photography is intricate to my artistic strategy, especially with regard to my etchings. In view of this, many of my printed images—accomplished via the studio techniques of intaglio, aquatint, drypoint, and Chine collè—originate from my own photographs, as well as ones I uncover during research into the archives of academia, historical societies, and museums. Upon locating a scene that fascinates me, I first sketch a few original drawings of the likeness, and next transfer that drawing onto my prepared zinc etching plate. NOTE: In my etchings that incorporate the Chine collè process, I use mulberry bark paper from Thailand, which is infused with Japanese kozo threads. The paper is also treated with methylcellulose. I endeavor to establish links between the metaphysical and physical worlds . . . between the realms of dream and reality . . . and between the natural and the fabricated. In a sense, I believe that art unveils everything that we mask behind our assumptions and biases . . . or rather, those realms we neglect—or refuse—to perceive. My label for our failure to examine these areas is, “The Phenomenology of Non-Connectedness", which I blame on today’s communicational tools such as Social Media, the Internet, texting on smart phones, and “tweeting”. MY ETCHING TECHNIQUE I work on metal etching plates treated with both hard and soft grounds. These grounds consist of mineral spirits, beeswax, oil of spike lavender, and other natural substances. After these grounds dry, I draw images with needles and other tools onto the plate. Next, the exposed areas are “etched into” the zinc or copper plate in a bath of Nitric Acid and spring water. An artist’s proof in then printed after the plate is cleaned; Moreover, two to seven additional plate workings, acid baths, and proof printings occur before my desired effect is obtained. When satisfied with my end result, I apply oil based etching ink onto the clean plate and then remove the excess ink with several wipes. Next, I align my etching plate onto the printing press bed and cover it with papers and press blankets. Finally, the plate goes through the press to obtain my print. This process is repeated until all editions are created. I usually create three to five editions of five or six etchings for each one of my plates.

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