view additional image 1
Sphinx Cat Sculptures



My Sphinx Cat sculptures are about relationships between humans and our natural environment, specifically living organisms within that environment. I have chosen to focus on the sphynx (or hairless) cat which was originally considered a genetic mutation, but in recent decades, has been actively bred for its unique appearance and sense of beauty. The sphynx cat has evolved largely as a result of changing tastes and preferences in pets, and due to a steady increase in the overall appeal of the breed. 



Contrary to what people might think, the sphynx is not an ancient cat from Egypt, but rather is a modern breed originating in the 1960s in Canada. Previous to this time, cats born without hair were basically looked upon as unable to survive on their own, and were often put put down by their owners. But a small handful of aficionados began to find them fascinating and aesthetically intriguing in their own unique ways, and began to beed and raise them as pets. And that is how the cats continue to be looked upon by discriminating pet owners today. 



Perhaps the most interesting aspect of the evolution of the breed is that due to a variety of inherent health issues, mother cats cannot raise them without human help. Their maternal instincts are not compatible with the unnaturalness of the selection process. 



So human assistance is vital for survival, not only with respect to the kittens but also the adult cats as well. The good news is that as genetic abnormalities once common to the cats have been gradually reduced and even eliminated by selective breeding, modern sphinx cats have become increasingly healthy and more able to survive on their own, much like many other types of cats. The sphynx, however, remains unable to live in the wild, and is fully dependent on human owners and their homes. This type of intervention in the natural order of things has given rise to questions about the extent to which humans should interfere with animals, the evolutionary process, or intervening in any other aspects of the environment.



These Sphinx Cat sculptures have been specifically created to point up this dilemma. They are cast in bronze, and highly polished in order to appear as though they are golden. The eyes are embedded with onyx stones in order to effect an intensity of gaze. The sculptures are presented on Crown Jewellery cushions in order to accentuate the unnaturalness of the breed as more related to aesthetics than survival. As such, they are intended to broach issues of when to question ourselves, our actions, and our interference in that which was originally meant to be.
Sphinx Cat Sculptures



My Sphinx Cat sculptures are about relationships between humans and our natural environment, specifically living organisms within that environment. I have chosen to focus on the sphynx (or hairless) cat which was originally considered a genetic mutation, but in recent decades, has been actively bred for its unique appearance and sense of beauty. The sphynx cat has evolved largely as a result of changing tastes and preferences in pets, and due to a steady increase in the overall appeal of the breed. 



Contrary to what people might think, the sphynx is not an ancient cat from Egypt, but rather is a modern breed originating in the 1960s in Canada. Previous to this time, cats born without hair were basically looked upon as unable to survive on their own, and were often put put down by their owners. But a small handful of aficionados began to find them fascinating and aesthetically intriguing in their own unique ways, and began to beed and raise them as pets. And that is how the cats continue to be looked upon by discriminating pet owners today. 



Perhaps the most interesting aspect of the evolution of the breed is that due to a variety of inherent health issues, mother cats cannot raise them without human help. Their maternal instincts are not compatible with the unnaturalness of the selection process. 



So human assistance is vital for survival, not only with respect to the kittens but also the adult cats as well. The good news is that as genetic abnormalities once common to the cats have been gradually reduced and even eliminated by selective breeding, modern sphinx cats have become increasingly healthy and more able to survive on their own, much like many other types of cats. The sphynx, however, remains unable to live in the wild, and is fully dependent on human owners and their homes. This type of intervention in the natural order of things has given rise to questions about the extent to which humans should interfere with animals, the evolutionary process, or intervening in any other aspects of the environment.



These Sphinx Cat sculptures have been specifically created to point up this dilemma. They are cast in bronze, and highly polished in order to appear as though they are golden. The eyes are embedded with onyx stones in order to effect an intensity of gaze. The sculptures are presented on Crown Jewellery cushions in order to accentuate the unnaturalness of the breed as more related to aesthetics than survival. As such, they are intended to broach issues of when to question ourselves, our actions, and our interference in that which was originally meant to be.
Sphinx Cat Sculptures



My Sphinx Cat sculptures are about relationships between humans and our natural environment, specifically living organisms within that environment. I have chosen to focus on the sphynx (or hairless) cat which was originally considered a genetic mutation, but in recent decades, has been actively bred for its unique appearance and sense of beauty. The sphynx cat has evolved largely as a result of changing tastes and preferences in pets, and due to a steady increase in the overall appeal of the breed. 



Contrary to what people might think, the sphynx is not an ancient cat from Egypt, but rather is a modern breed originating in the 1960s in Canada. Previous to this time, cats born without hair were basically looked upon as unable to survive on their own, and were often put put down by their owners. But a small handful of aficionados began to find them fascinating and aesthetically intriguing in their own unique ways, and began to beed and raise them as pets. And that is how the cats continue to be looked upon by discriminating pet owners today. 



Perhaps the most interesting aspect of the evolution of the breed is that due to a variety of inherent health issues, mother cats cannot raise them without human help. Their maternal instincts are not compatible with the unnaturalness of the selection process. 



So human assistance is vital for survival, not only with respect to the kittens but also the adult cats as well. The good news is that as genetic abnormalities once common to the cats have been gradually reduced and even eliminated by selective breeding, modern sphinx cats have become increasingly healthy and more able to survive on their own, much like many other types of cats. The sphynx, however, remains unable to live in the wild, and is fully dependent on human owners and their homes. This type of intervention in the natural order of things has given rise to questions about the extent to which humans should interfere with animals, the evolutionary process, or intervening in any other aspects of the environment.



These Sphinx Cat sculptures have been specifically created to point up this dilemma. They are cast in bronze, and highly polished in order to appear as though they are golden. The eyes are embedded with onyx stones in order to effect an intensity of gaze. The sculptures are presented on Crown Jewellery cushions in order to accentuate the unnaturalness of the breed as more related to aesthetics than survival. As such, they are intended to broach issues of when to question ourselves, our actions, and our interference in that which was originally meant to be.
Sphinx Cat Sculptures



My Sphinx Cat sculptures are about relationships between humans and our natural environment, specifically living organisms within that environment. I have chosen to focus on the sphynx (or hairless) cat which was originally considered a genetic mutation, but in recent decades, has been actively bred for its unique appearance and sense of beauty. The sphynx cat has evolved largely as a result of changing tastes and preferences in pets, and due to a steady increase in the overall appeal of the breed. 



Contrary to what people might think, the sphynx is not an ancient cat from Egypt, but rather is a modern breed originating in the 1960s in Canada. Previous to this time, cats born without hair were basically looked upon as unable to survive on their own, and were often put put down by their owners. But a small handful of aficionados began to find them fascinating and aesthetically intriguing in their own unique ways, and began to beed and raise them as pets. And that is how the cats continue to be looked upon by discriminating pet owners today. 



Perhaps the most interesting aspect of the evolution of the breed is that due to a variety of inherent health issues, mother cats cannot raise them without human help. Their maternal instincts are not compatible with the unnaturalness of the selection process. 



So human assistance is vital for survival, not only with respect to the kittens but also the adult cats as well. The good news is that as genetic abnormalities once common to the cats have been gradually reduced and even eliminated by selective breeding, modern sphinx cats have become increasingly healthy and more able to survive on their own, much like many other types of cats. The sphynx, however, remains unable to live in the wild, and is fully dependent on human owners and their homes. This type of intervention in the natural order of things has given rise to questions about the extent to which humans should interfere with animals, the evolutionary process, or intervening in any other aspects of the environment.



These Sphinx Cat sculptures have been specifically created to point up this dilemma. They are cast in bronze, and highly polished in order to appear as though they are golden. The eyes are embedded with onyx stones in order to effect an intensity of gaze. The sculptures are presented on Crown Jewellery cushions in order to accentuate the unnaturalness of the breed as more related to aesthetics than survival. As such, they are intended to broach issues of when to question ourselves, our actions, and our interference in that which was originally meant to be.
Sphinx Cat Sculptures



My Sphinx Cat sculptures are about relationships between humans and our natural environment, specifically living organisms within that environment. I have chosen to focus on the sphynx (or hairless) cat which was originally considered a genetic mutation, but in recent decades, has been actively bred for its unique appearance and sense of beauty. The sphynx cat has evolved largely as a result of changing tastes and preferences in pets, and due to a steady increase in the overall appeal of the breed. 



Contrary to what people might think, the sphynx is not an ancient cat from Egypt, but rather is a modern breed originating in the 1960s in Canada. Previous to this time, cats born without hair were basically looked upon as unable to survive on their own, and were often put put down by their owners. But a small handful of aficionados began to find them fascinating and aesthetically intriguing in their own unique ways, and began to beed and raise them as pets. And that is how the cats continue to be looked upon by discriminating pet owners today. 



Perhaps the most interesting aspect of the evolution of the breed is that due to a variety of inherent health issues, mother cats cannot raise them without human help. Their maternal instincts are not compatible with the unnaturalness of the selection process. 



So human assistance is vital for survival, not only with respect to the kittens but also the adult cats as well. The good news is that as genetic abnormalities once common to the cats have been gradually reduced and even eliminated by selective breeding, modern sphinx cats have become increasingly healthy and more able to survive on their own, much like many other types of cats. The sphynx, however, remains unable to live in the wild, and is fully dependent on human owners and their homes. This type of intervention in the natural order of things has given rise to questions about the extent to which humans should interfere with animals, the evolutionary process, or intervening in any other aspects of the environment.



These Sphinx Cat sculptures have been specifically created to point up this dilemma. They are cast in bronze, and highly polished in order to appear as though they are golden. The eyes are embedded with onyx stones in order to effect an intensity of gaze. The sculptures are presented on Crown Jewellery cushions in order to accentuate the unnaturalness of the breed as more related to aesthetics than survival. As such, they are intended to broach issues of when to question ourselves, our actions, and our interference in that which was originally meant to be.
1157 Views
48

VIEW IN MY ROOM

Sphinx Cat II Sculpture

Andrzej Szymczyk

United Kingdom

Sculpture, Bronze on Bronze

Size: 23.6 W x 20.5 H x 7.9 D in

Ships in a Box

info-circle

check Shipping included

check 7 day money-back guarantee

info-circle
Primary imagePrimary imagePrimary imagePrimary imagePrimary image Trustpilot Score
1157 Views
48

Interested in licensing this image?

Learn More

Artist Recognition

link - Showed at the The Other Art Fair

Showed at the The Other Art Fair

link - Artist featured in a collection

Artist featured in a collection

About The Artwork

Sphinx Cat Sculptures My Sphinx Cat sculptures are about relationships between humans and our natural environment, specifically living organisms within that environment. I have chosen to focus on the sphynx (or hairless) cat which was originally considered a genetic mutation, but in recent decades, has been actively bred for its unique appearance and sense of beauty. The sphynx cat has evolved largely as a result of changing tastes and preferences in pets, and due to a steady increase in the overall appeal of the breed.  Contrary to what people might think, the sphynx is not an ancient cat from Egypt, but rather is a modern breed originating in the 1960s in Canada. Previous to this time, cats born without hair were basically looked upon as unable to survive on their own, and were often put put down by their owners. But a small handful of aficionados began to find them fascinating and aesthetically intriguing in their own unique ways, and began to beed and raise them as pets. And that is how the cats continue to be looked upon by discriminating pet owners today.  Perhaps the most interesting aspect of the evolution of the breed is that due to a variety of inherent health issues, mother cats cannot raise them without human help. Their maternal instincts are not compatible with the unnaturalness of the selection process.  So human assistance is vital for survival, not only with respect to the kittens but also the adult cats as well. The good news is that as genetic abnormalities once common to the cats have been gradually reduced and even eliminated by selective breeding, modern sphinx cats have become increasingly healthy and more able to survive on their own, much like many other types of cats. The sphynx, however, remains unable to live in the wild, and is fully dependent on human owners and their homes. This type of intervention in the natural order of things has given rise to questions about the extent to which humans should interfere with animals, the evolutionary process, or intervening in any other aspects of the environment. These Sphinx Cat sculptures have been specifically created to point up this dilemma. They are cast in bronze, and highly polished in order to appear as though they are golden. The eyes are embedded with onyx stones in order to effect an intensity of gaze. The sculptures are presented on Crown Jewellery cushions in order to accentuate the unnaturalness of the breed as more related to aesthetics than survival. As such, they are intended to broach issues of when to question ourselves, our actions, and our interference in that which was originally meant to be.

Details & Dimensions

Sculpture:Bronze on Bronze

Original:One-of-a-kind Artwork

Size:23.6 W x 20.5 H x 7.9 D in

Shipping & Returns

Delivery Time:Typically 5-7 business days for domestic shipments, 10-14 business days for international shipments.

My sculpture is founded in hyperrealism in human and animal forms which I then blend with varying degrees of expressive interpretation. Careful study and deep analysis of the anatomy of every subject I sculpt enables me to recreate the subtlest tensions of musculature and movement, and to articulate my vision with high levels of accuracy. This deep understanding of physical characteristics gives me the ability to manipulate and create something new, rather than recreate the reality. In doing so, I strive for my sculptures have an emotional impact on the viewer, to call to mind memories or tell stories, as if each has its own spirit that is emerging from within.

Artist Recognition

Showed at the The Other Art Fair

Handpicked to show at The Other Art Fair presented by Saatchi Art in London, London

Artist featured in a collection

Artist featured by Saatchi Art in a collection

Thousands Of Five-Star Reviews

We deliver world-class customer service to all of our art buyers.

globe

Global Selection

Explore an unparalleled artwork selection by artists from around the world.

Satisfaction Guaranteed

Our 7-day, money-back guarantee allows you to buy with confidence.

Support An Artist With Every Purchase

We pay our artists more on every sale than other galleries.

Need More Help?

Enjoy Complimentary Art Advisory Contact Customer Support