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Media: PLA filament (for 3D printing pen), resin, brass, patina

Part of a non-traditional exploration of lace in the exhibition, A Certain Kind of Armor. Using 3D printing pens to preserve the core acts of drawing and writing, Gardner-Roe references shield and body forms that allude to systems of protection through layers of metal and patinas, yet deny a literal translation. The open lacelike network of this body of sculpture begs the question, “What is being protected?” 

The round shape of this work references shields, but so big in this case that the whole body could hide behind. Regarding the theme of protection, I often think about how to protect that childlike sense of exuberance when we first picked up a crayon, especially as a working artist. Thus, the imagery in this work references childhood memories of growing up in the rural Midwest.

Lastly, I am often asked how these pieces are made. It is a layered process that starts out with a 3D printing pen (imagine a hand-held 3D printer, controlled by the artist's hand rather than a computer). After the initial "drawing" is made on glass, I then thicken my line weights with resin and lastly, the work is coated in metal, brass in this case. Since real metal is applied, making it essentially plated, I can then patina the work like traditional sculpture. Thus, the colors seen are either the brass itself or a chemical reaction with the brass.

This work is mounted on 3/4" white PCV panel with a 3/4" beveled edge. The metal has been sealed to prevent further oxidation and changes in color.
Media: PLA filament (for 3D printing pen), resin, brass, patina

Part of a non-traditional exploration of lace in the exhibition, A Certain Kind of Armor. Using 3D printing pens to preserve the core acts of drawing and writing, Gardner-Roe references shield and body forms that allude to systems of protection through layers of metal and patinas, yet deny a literal translation. The open lacelike network of this body of sculpture begs the question, “What is being protected?” 

The round shape of this work references shields, but so big in this case that the whole body could hide behind. Regarding the theme of protection, I often think about how to protect that childlike sense of exuberance when we first picked up a crayon, especially as a working artist. Thus, the imagery in this work references childhood memories of growing up in the rural Midwest.

Lastly, I am often asked how these pieces are made. It is a layered process that starts out with a 3D printing pen (imagine a hand-held 3D printer, controlled by the artist's hand rather than a computer). After the initial "drawing" is made on glass, I then thicken my line weights with resin and lastly, the work is coated in metal, brass in this case. Since real metal is applied, making it essentially plated, I can then patina the work like traditional sculpture. Thus, the colors seen are either the brass itself or a chemical reaction with the brass.

This work is mounted on 3/4" white PCV panel with a 3/4" beveled edge. The metal has been sealed to prevent further oxidation and changes in color.
Media: PLA filament (for 3D printing pen), resin, brass, patina

Part of a non-traditional exploration of lace in the exhibition, A Certain Kind of Armor. Using 3D printing pens to preserve the core acts of drawing and writing, Gardner-Roe references shield and body forms that allude to systems of protection through layers of metal and patinas, yet deny a literal translation. The open lacelike network of this body of sculpture begs the question, “What is being protected?” 

The round shape of this work references shields, but so big in this case that the whole body could hide behind. Regarding the theme of protection, I often think about how to protect that childlike sense of exuberance when we first picked up a crayon, especially as a working artist. Thus, the imagery in this work references childhood memories of growing up in the rural Midwest.

Lastly, I am often asked how these pieces are made. It is a layered process that starts out with a 3D printing pen (imagine a hand-held 3D printer, controlled by the artist's hand rather than a computer). After the initial "drawing" is made on glass, I then thicken my line weights with resin and lastly, the work is coated in metal, brass in this case. Since real metal is applied, making it essentially plated, I can then patina the work like traditional sculpture. Thus, the colors seen are either the brass itself or a chemical reaction with the brass.

This work is mounted on 3/4" white PCV panel with a 3/4" beveled edge. The metal has been sealed to prevent further oxidation and changes in color.
Media: PLA filament (for 3D printing pen), resin, brass, patina

Part of a non-traditional exploration of lace in the exhibition, A Certain Kind of Armor. Using 3D printing pens to preserve the core acts of drawing and writing, Gardner-Roe references shield and body forms that allude to systems of protection through layers of metal and patinas, yet deny a literal translation. The open lacelike network of this body of sculpture begs the question, “What is being protected?” 

The round shape of this work references shields, but so big in this case that the whole body could hide behind. Regarding the theme of protection, I often think about how to protect that childlike sense of exuberance when we first picked up a crayon, especially as a working artist. Thus, the imagery in this work references childhood memories of growing up in the rural Midwest.

Lastly, I am often asked how these pieces are made. It is a layered process that starts out with a 3D printing pen (imagine a hand-held 3D printer, controlled by the artist's hand rather than a computer). After the initial "drawing" is made on glass, I then thicken my line weights with resin and lastly, the work is coated in metal, brass in this case. Since real metal is applied, making it essentially plated, I can then patina the work like traditional sculpture. Thus, the colors seen are either the brass itself or a chemical reaction with the brass.

This work is mounted on 3/4" white PCV panel with a 3/4" beveled edge. The metal has been sealed to prevent further oxidation and changes in color.
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Super Shield No. 2: Camouflage
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Super Shield No. 2: Camouflage Sculpture

Rachelle Gardner-Roe

United States

Sculpture, Metal on Plastic

Size: 47 W x 47 H x 1 D in

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About The Artwork

Media: PLA filament (for 3D printing pen), resin, brass, patina Part of a non-traditional exploration of lace in the exhibition, A Certain Kind of Armor. Using 3D printing pens to preserve the core acts of drawing and writing, Gardner-Roe references shield and body forms that allude to systems of protection through layers of metal and patinas, yet deny a literal translation. The open lacelike network of this body of sculpture begs the question, “What is being protected?” The round shape of this work references shields, but so big in this case that the whole body could hide behind. Regarding the theme of protection, I often think about how to protect that childlike sense of exuberance when we first picked up a crayon, especially as a working artist. Thus, the imagery in this work references childhood memories of growing up in the rural Midwest. Lastly, I am often asked how these pieces are made. It is a layered process that starts out with a 3D printing pen (imagine a hand-held 3D printer, controlled by the artist's hand rather than a computer). After the initial "drawing" is made on glass, I then thicken my line weights with resin and lastly, the work is coated in metal, brass in this case. Since real metal is applied, making it essentially plated, I can then patina the work like traditional sculpture. Thus, the colors seen are either the brass itself or a chemical reaction with the brass. This work is mounted on 3/4" white PCV panel with a 3/4" beveled edge. The metal has been sealed to prevent further oxidation and changes in color.

Details & Dimensions

Sculpture:Metal on Plastic

Original:One-of-a-kind Artwork

Size:47 W x 47 H x 1 D in

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My lace sculpture is an act in seeking balance, of repeatedly introducing contradiction and opposition to show that a harmonious equilibrium is possible. Combining the flowing, inherently feminine lace with hard, industrial man-made resin alters the inherent quality of each material. Each goes through a process of loss and gain. The result is a dimensional expression of politically-soiled notion of compromise. Here, balance creates porous solidity, frozen fluidity, a three-dimensional canvas. I consider my all my work to be works in lace, and in lace, I see more than kitsch doilies or superficial decoration. Lace represents countless individual threads intertwined to create interdependent networks with the nuance of connection shaping endless possibilities of pattern. As broad as this cultural metaphor might be, lace also represents the intimate and delicate, as well as the domestic and historic traditions in handcraft. I am influenced by the passing down of handcraft from one generation to another, while also striving to re-contextualize traditional craft. In my sculpture, this contextualization occurs primarily through the lens of science and mathematics. These influences can be reflected within bodies of work in ways that utilize the design principles of origami, invisibly physical forces such as gravity, or the way that a single simple curve can transmute a formless plane into mathematically complex geometry. My work has always been grounded in this nature of dichotomy and the oscillating exchange that occurs by combining dissimilar media and processes is an expression of the desire for and in search of balance in body, mind, and action.

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