Inside the Glossy Lining Installation by Dangerous Minds Artists

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Inside the Glossy Lining

Dangerous Minds Artists

United Kingdom

Installation

Size: 31.5 W x 43.3 H x 2 D in

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Art Description

Installation: Neon, Paper mache, Ink, Oil on Glass, Wood, Aluminium.

Linear Musings

Play on a series of subliminal elements...

The unconscious nostalgic recognition of the Damask pattern flock motif acts as the support for a group of subliminal signifiers.

A narrative symbology is imparted by the stylised neon luminaire...deriving their forms from magical symbols and deconstructed graphic references relating to the implied narrative.

The colour field treatment of the base panels references a duality, order and chaos again interplay in disciplined and apparently random paint applications. The tonal values of the damask, counterpoised by the liquid paint runs, and the glitter regularity counterpoised by swept gestural impasto.
(The swept gestural impasto references the incised information found on a vinyl record, at the same time resembling lines if computer code... yet another form of linear narrative...)

The actual Linear Musing texts are derived from a collection of poems by Michael Scott... entitled... Little Usherette. They delve into a post Lynchian dystopic relationship between a cinema patron an usherette, the object of his affection. Four further Musings are derived from deconstructed advertising slogans, reassembled into cryptic statements and appellations.

The panels at the base of the works once again return to nostalgic origin, referencing the pastel chromatic banding found on the covers of 1960's Mills and Boon romantic novellas. A further level of symbolism is imparted by the nursery colours of powder blue and pink, which in turn act as a carrier for the aluminium lettered text... which is itself applied in floristry letters, normally reserved for funeral wreaths.... thus neatly encapsulating the cycle of life.

So in conclusion, what may at first resemble a decorative panel in an amusement arcade, is actually a symbol laden meditation on the infinite complexity of life and the complexity of dilemmas and opportunities it presents


Subjects:

Abstract

Artist Recognition

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