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In his sculptures, Terry Dimoulias questions heteronormativity by bringing an object of great cultural significance – lace – into dialogue with the human figure – one of the oldest subjects in art. For instance, we could draw connections with the sculptures of antiquity, whose aesthetics have defined the Western canon. In spite of their multiple references to this past, however, Dimoulias’s figures stand beyond easy categorisation, and are playfully non-gendered. Their anatomy, posture, clothing and lace all seem to contradict each other, in a constant blurring between the “masculine” and the “feminine”. This effect is further accentuated by the fact that they are “dissected” or “half” – seemingly missing what would have made them full representations.
 
At the same time, through their principal material, the sculptures also allude to the relations of power behind patriarchal family, which have at their core money – lace is still used in Dimoulias’s home country Greece, and in other places around the world, as part of the traditional marriage inheritance gift (“preeka” / “προίκα”). Notably, the pieces of lace used in the sculptures belong to the artist’s personal collection of inherited cutwork lace.
In his sculptures, Terry Dimoulias questions heteronormativity by bringing an object of great cultural significance – lace – into dialogue with the human figure – one of the oldest subjects in art. For instance, we could draw connections with the sculptures of antiquity, whose aesthetics have defined the Western canon. In spite of their multiple references to this past, however, Dimoulias’s figures stand beyond easy categorisation, and are playfully non-gendered. Their anatomy, posture, clothing and lace all seem to contradict each other, in a constant blurring between the “masculine” and the “feminine”. This effect is further accentuated by the fact that they are “dissected” or “half” – seemingly missing what would have made them full representations.
 
At the same time, through their principal material, the sculptures also allude to the relations of power behind patriarchal family, which have at their core money – lace is still used in Dimoulias’s home country Greece, and in other places around the world, as part of the traditional marriage inheritance gift (“preeka” / “προίκα”). Notably, the pieces of lace used in the sculptures belong to the artist’s personal collection of inherited cutwork lace.
In his sculptures, Terry Dimoulias questions heteronormativity by bringing an object of great cultural significance – lace – into dialogue with the human figure – one of the oldest subjects in art. For instance, we could draw connections with the sculptures of antiquity, whose aesthetics have defined the Western canon. In spite of their multiple references to this past, however, Dimoulias’s figures stand beyond easy categorisation, and are playfully non-gendered. Their anatomy, posture, clothing and lace all seem to contradict each other, in a constant blurring between the “masculine” and the “feminine”. This effect is further accentuated by the fact that they are “dissected” or “half” – seemingly missing what would have made them full representations.
 
At the same time, through their principal material, the sculptures also allude to the relations of power behind patriarchal family, which have at their core money – lace is still used in Dimoulias’s home country Greece, and in other places around the world, as part of the traditional marriage inheritance gift (“preeka” / “προίκα”). Notably, the pieces of lace used in the sculptures belong to the artist’s personal collection of inherited cutwork lace.
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Semén figure I
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Semén figure I Sculpture

Terry Dimoulias

United Kingdom

Sculpture, Fabric on Soft (Yarn, Cotton, Fabric)

Size: 43.3 W x 51.2 H x 43.3 D in

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Showed at the The Other Art Fair

About The Artwork

In his sculptures, Terry Dimoulias questions heteronormativity by bringing an object of great cultural significance – lace – into dialogue with the human figure – one of the oldest subjects in art. For instance, we could draw connections with the sculptures of antiquity, whose aesthetics have defined the Western canon. In spite of their multiple references to this past, however, Dimoulias’s figures stand beyond easy categorisation, and are playfully non-gendered. Their anatomy, posture, clothing and lace all seem to contradict each other, in a constant blurring between the “masculine” and the “feminine”. This effect is further accentuated by the fact that they are “dissected” or “half” – seemingly missing what would have made them full representations. At the same time, through their principal material, the sculptures also allude to the relations of power behind patriarchal family, which have at their core money – lace is still used in Dimoulias’s home country Greece, and in other places around the world, as part of the traditional marriage inheritance gift (“preeka” / “προίκα”). Notably, the pieces of lace used in the sculptures belong to the artist’s personal collection of inherited cutwork lace.

Details & Dimensions

Sculpture:Fabric on Soft (Yarn, Cotton, Fabric)

Original:One-of-a-kind Artwork

Size:43.3 W x 51.2 H x 43.3 D in

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Terry Dimoulias was born in 1983 in Greece. For over a decade, he worked as a freelance photographer, with his work spanning different genres and publication formats. In 2015, he decided to move to the United Kingdom in order to expand his artistic practice by pursuing an MA in Photography at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London. In his current work, he employs agricultural products from his own land back in Greece, as well as family-inherited lace and linen fabrics, in order to reflect on gender, immigration and the displacement of trauma in contemporary identities. In May 2019, he was awarded The Other Art Fair Postgraduate Art Prize for his sculptural series “Semén figures”. His forthcoming exhibitions include presentations at Long Gallery of Newcastle University, and at Central Saint Martins.

Artist Recognition

Showed at the The Other Art Fair

Handpicked to show at The Other Art Fair presented by Saatchi Art in London

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