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William Eugene Smith in the spring day when he made his Paradise Garden photograph, he was in the midst of a spiritual crisis. His memories of the horrors of what he'd witnessed on Saipan and Iwo Jima and other battlefields still brutally fresh in his mind, Smith had not made a photograph in many months. He was not sure that he could make another photograph that would, ultimately, matter.
It was to be a day, he later recalled, "of spiritual decision." He grabbed a camera and went outside with his young children, Pat and Juanita. He followed his children. He watched, and waited. And then, right in front of him, he saw it unfold.
"... they were delighted at every little discovery!—and observed them, I suddenly realized that at this moment, in spite of everything, in spite of all the wars and all I had gone through that day, I wanted to sing a sonnet to life and to the courage to go on living it..."
Damaged, hesitant, frightened—W. Eugene Smith had every excuse in the world not to spend that spring afternoon walking in the woods with his young children, hoping and perhaps even praying for a moment to reveal itself, a moment that would force him to raise the camera to his eye, and shoot. To his eternal credit, however, he did exactly that—and viewers have been drawing inspiration from his private, solitary triumph ever since. (Ben Cosgrove - Time - Sep 05 2013)
Observing the photo taken from the back side I was forced to figure out what was happening in the front and what if Pat an Juanita were new millennium children.
William Eugene Smith in the spring day when he made his Paradise Garden photograph, he was in the midst of a spiritual crisis. His memories of the horrors of what he'd witnessed on Saipan and Iwo Jima and other battlefields still brutally fresh in his mind, Smith had not made a photograph in many months. He was not sure that he could make another photograph that would, ultimately, matter.
It was to be a day, he later recalled, "of spiritual decision." He grabbed a camera and went outside with his young children, Pat and Juanita. He followed his children. He watched, and waited. And then, right in front of him, he saw it unfold.
"... they were delighted at every little discovery!—and observed them, I suddenly realized that at this moment, in spite of everything, in spite of all the wars and all I had gone through that day, I wanted to sing a sonnet to life and to the courage to go on living it..."
Damaged, hesitant, frightened—W. Eugene Smith had every excuse in the world not to spend that spring afternoon walking in the woods with his young children, hoping and perhaps even praying for a moment to reveal itself, a moment that would force him to raise the camera to his eye, and shoot. To his eternal credit, however, he did exactly that—and viewers have been drawing inspiration from his private, solitary triumph ever since. (Ben Cosgrove - Time - Sep 05 2013)
Observing the photo taken from the back side I was forced to figure out what was happening in the front and what if Pat an Juanita were new millennium children.
William Eugene Smith in the spring day when he made his Paradise Garden photograph, he was in the midst of a spiritual crisis. His memories of the horrors of what he'd witnessed on Saipan and Iwo Jima and other battlefields still brutally fresh in his mind, Smith had not made a photograph in many months. He was not sure that he could make another photograph that would, ultimately, matter.
It was to be a day, he later recalled, "of spiritual decision." He grabbed a camera and went outside with his young children, Pat and Juanita. He followed his children. He watched, and waited. And then, right in front of him, he saw it unfold.
"... they were delighted at every little discovery!—and observed them, I suddenly realized that at this moment, in spite of everything, in spite of all the wars and all I had gone through that day, I wanted to sing a sonnet to life and to the courage to go on living it..."
Damaged, hesitant, frightened—W. Eugene Smith had every excuse in the world not to spend that spring afternoon walking in the woods with his young children, hoping and perhaps even praying for a moment to reveal itself, a moment that would force him to raise the camera to his eye, and shoot. To his eternal credit, however, he did exactly that—and viewers have been drawing inspiration from his private, solitary triumph ever since. (Ben Cosgrove - Time - Sep 05 2013)
Observing the photo taken from the back side I was forced to figure out what was happening in the front and what if Pat an Juanita were new millennium children.
William Eugene Smith in the spring day when he made his Paradise Garden photograph, he was in the midst of a spiritual crisis. His memories of the horrors of what he'd witnessed on Saipan and Iwo Jima and other battlefields still brutally fresh in his mind, Smith had not made a photograph in many months. He was not sure that he could make another photograph that would, ultimately, matter.
It was to be a day, he later recalled, "of spiritual decision." He grabbed a camera and went outside with his young children, Pat and Juanita. He followed his children. He watched, and waited. And then, right in front of him, he saw it unfold.
"... they were delighted at every little discovery!—and observed them, I suddenly realized that at this moment, in spite of everything, in spite of all the wars and all I had gone through that day, I wanted to sing a sonnet to life and to the courage to go on living it..."
Damaged, hesitant, frightened—W. Eugene Smith had every excuse in the world not to spend that spring afternoon walking in the woods with his young children, hoping and perhaps even praying for a moment to reveal itself, a moment that would force him to raise the camera to his eye, and shoot. To his eternal credit, however, he did exactly that—and viewers have been drawing inspiration from his private, solitary triumph ever since. (Ben Cosgrove - Time - Sep 05 2013)
Observing the photo taken from the back side I was forced to figure out what was happening in the front and what if Pat an Juanita were new millennium children.
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Walk to Paradise Garden (Pokemon Go)
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Walk to Paradise Garden (Pokemon Go) Sculpture

Attilio Geva

Italy

Sculpture, Wax on Ceramic

Size: 8.3 W x 9.4 H x 7.9 D in

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About The Artwork

William Eugene Smith in the spring day when he made his Paradise Garden photograph, he was in the midst of a spiritual crisis. His memories of the horrors of what he'd witnessed on Saipan and Iwo Jima and other battlefields still brutally fresh in his mind, Smith had not made a photograph in many months. He was not sure that he could make another photograph that would, ultimately, matter. It was to be a day, he later recalled, "of spiritual decision." He grabbed a camera and went outside with his young children, Pat and Juanita. He followed his children. He watched, and waited. And then, right in front of him, he saw it unfold. "... they were delighted at every little discovery!—and observed them, I suddenly realized that at this moment, in spite of everything, in spite of all the wars and all I had gone through that day, I wanted to sing a sonnet to life and to the courage to go on living it..." Damaged, hesitant, frightened—W. Eugene Smith had every excuse in the world not to spend that spring afternoon walking in the woods with his young children, hoping and perhaps even praying for a moment to reveal itself, a moment that would force him to raise the camera to his eye, and shoot. To his eternal credit, however, he did exactly that—and viewers have been drawing inspiration from his private, solitary triumph ever since. (Ben Cosgrove - Time - Sep 05 2013) Observing the photo taken from the back side I was forced to figure out what was happening in the front and what if Pat an Juanita were new millennium children.

Details & Dimensions

Sculpture:Wax on Ceramic

Original:One-of-a-kind Artwork

Size:8.3 W x 9.4 H x 7.9 D in

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Delivery Time:Typically 5-7 business days for domestic shipments, 10-14 business days for international shipments.

Attilio Geva was born in 1948 in a small village in the region of Liguria, Italy, and he currently lives in a farmhouse in the countryside near the town of Todi. A former officer in the merchant navy, ex-manager and IT businessman, he has devoted himself to painting since his childhood. For the last twenty years, he has been working as a full-time artist carrying out specific projects about topics such as Darwinism, faith and fundamentalisms, egocentrism and cooperation, and the relationship between music and painting. Attilio Geva nato nel 1948 in un piccolo paese della Liguria attualmente vive in un casale in aperta campagna vicino a Todi. Ex-ufficiale della marina mercantile, ex-manager e imprenditore nel campo dell’informatica, si dedica alla pittura fin dalla infanzia. Da circa venti anni svolge attività artistica a tempo pieno realizzando specifici progetti su tematiche quali: darwinismo, fede e fondamentalismi, egocentrismo e cooperazione, relazioni fra musica e pittura

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