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A dystopia (from Ancient Greek δυσ- "bad" and τόπος "place"; alternatively, cacotopia, kakotopia, or simply 
(anti-utopia) is a community or society that is undesirable or frightening. 
It is translated as "not-good place" and is an antonym of utopia, a term that was coined by Sir Thomas More and figures as the title of his best known work, Utopia, published 1516, a blueprint for an ideal society with minimal crime, violence and poverty.

Dystopias are often characterized by dehumanization, tyrannical governments, environmental disaster, or other characteristics associated with a cataclysmic decline in society. Dystopian societies appear in many fictional works and artistic representations particularly in stories set in the future. Some of the most famous examples are George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four and Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. Dystopian societies appear in many sub-genres of fiction and are often used to draw attention to society, environment, politics, economics, religion, psychology, ethics, science or technology. Some authors use the term to refer to existing societies, many of which are or have been totalitarian states or societies in an advanced state of collapse.
A dystopia (from Ancient Greek δυσ- "bad" and τόπος "place"; alternatively, cacotopia, kakotopia, or simply 
(anti-utopia) is a community or society that is undesirable or frightening. 
It is translated as "not-good place" and is an antonym of utopia, a term that was coined by Sir Thomas More and figures as the title of his best known work, Utopia, published 1516, a blueprint for an ideal society with minimal crime, violence and poverty.

Dystopias are often characterized by dehumanization, tyrannical governments, environmental disaster, or other characteristics associated with a cataclysmic decline in society. Dystopian societies appear in many fictional works and artistic representations particularly in stories set in the future. Some of the most famous examples are George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four and Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. Dystopian societies appear in many sub-genres of fiction and are often used to draw attention to society, environment, politics, economics, religion, psychology, ethics, science or technology. Some authors use the term to refer to existing societies, many of which are or have been totalitarian states or societies in an advanced state of collapse.
A dystopia (from Ancient Greek δυσ- "bad" and τόπος "place"; alternatively, cacotopia, kakotopia, or simply 
(anti-utopia) is a community or society that is undesirable or frightening. 
It is translated as "not-good place" and is an antonym of utopia, a term that was coined by Sir Thomas More and figures as the title of his best known work, Utopia, published 1516, a blueprint for an ideal society with minimal crime, violence and poverty.

Dystopias are often characterized by dehumanization, tyrannical governments, environmental disaster, or other characteristics associated with a cataclysmic decline in society. Dystopian societies appear in many fictional works and artistic representations particularly in stories set in the future. Some of the most famous examples are George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four and Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. Dystopian societies appear in many sub-genres of fiction and are often used to draw attention to society, environment, politics, economics, religion, psychology, ethics, science or technology. Some authors use the term to refer to existing societies, many of which are or have been totalitarian states or societies in an advanced state of collapse.
A dystopia (from Ancient Greek δυσ- "bad" and τόπος "place"; alternatively, cacotopia, kakotopia, or simply 
(anti-utopia) is a community or society that is undesirable or frightening. 
It is translated as "not-good place" and is an antonym of utopia, a term that was coined by Sir Thomas More and figures as the title of his best known work, Utopia, published 1516, a blueprint for an ideal society with minimal crime, violence and poverty.

Dystopias are often characterized by dehumanization, tyrannical governments, environmental disaster, or other characteristics associated with a cataclysmic decline in society. Dystopian societies appear in many fictional works and artistic representations particularly in stories set in the future. Some of the most famous examples are George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four and Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. Dystopian societies appear in many sub-genres of fiction and are often used to draw attention to society, environment, politics, economics, religion, psychology, ethics, science or technology. Some authors use the term to refer to existing societies, many of which are or have been totalitarian states or societies in an advanced state of collapse.
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Dystopia 003 Painting

Mota Montero

Germany

Painting, Acrylic on Paper

Size: 27.5 W x 39.3 H x 0.1 D in

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About The Artwork

A dystopia (from Ancient Greek δυσ- "bad" and τόπος "place"; alternatively, cacotopia, kakotopia, or simply (anti-utopia) is a community or society that is undesirable or frightening. It is translated as "not-good place" and is an antonym of utopia, a term that was coined by Sir Thomas More and figures as the title of his best known work, Utopia, published 1516, a blueprint for an ideal society with minimal crime, violence and poverty. Dystopias are often characterized by dehumanization, tyrannical governments, environmental disaster, or other characteristics associated with a cataclysmic decline in society. Dystopian societies appear in many fictional works and artistic representations particularly in stories set in the future. Some of the most famous examples are George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four and Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. Dystopian societies appear in many sub-genres of fiction and are often used to draw attention to society, environment, politics, economics, religion, psychology, ethics, science or technology. Some authors use the term to refer to existing societies, many of which are or have been totalitarian states or societies in an advanced state of collapse.

Details & Dimensions

Painting:Acrylic on Paper

Original:One-of-a-kind Artwork

Size:27.5 W x 39.3 H x 0.1 D in

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Delivery Time:Typically 5-7 business days for domestic shipments, 10-14 business days for international shipments.

Mota Montero: The Multitalented Artist Mota Montero is a graphic designer and photographer with years of experience in the advertisement world. He is also an entrepreneur and loves architecture. In the past, he used to run a successful construction company. However, he has dedicated his life to art because it makes sense to him and his lifestyle. Moreover, the “Corona Pandemic” was an opportunity for Mota to create a gallery that focuses on finding the best artists worldwide and promoting them to let them thrive. This gallery now features young artists and up-and-coming geniuses in the world of art. Who Is Mota Montero? Montero was born in Santiago, Chile's capital. His work life is around architectural design, while his paintings are expressions of his sentiments and emotions. As a result, he appreciates a wide range of abstract painting techniques. He is able to experience a variety of alternatives using free approaches that allow him to work with an array of substances and colors, always resulting in unique masterpieces. Color and artistic originality and a willingness to discover new things define Jose Montero's work. Mota Montero serves as a designer, but painting is his true love. The painter, who works out of a studio in Germany, also appears to possess an excessive amount of information. He sees the little things in life and uses his art to share them with others. The printing process attracts montero, and his work incorporates intriguing patterns. Acrylics and mixed media are his primary mediums. Jose Montero showed an early aptitude for the arts, not just in painting but also in drawing and conceptual design. Since 2017, the artist has lived and worked in the Stuttgart area. Jose Montero showed early skill and interest in the arts, not only in paintings but also in drawings and design ideas. After finishing his communication design studies in Germany, he performed his internship at VH1 in Los Angeles. After that, he co-founded art and design studios in Berlin and Santiago, Chile. Apart from art and design, he is drawn to construction, which he has learned via self-study and transformed into exhibition displays for Chile and abroad and several self-designed and built housing developments in Chile. What Does Mota Montero Like? He committed his whole professional life to architecture and design. In his paintings, however, he expresses his inner feelings and moods. The artist chooses from a variety of abstract art styles.

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