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This work is a tribute to all black women on the planet, especially those who with their courage and decision decided to change the world through their actions and thoughts to make it more just, although many times these lead to retaliation against them and their families.

To send the piece, first the piece is wrapped with a thin layer of acid-free paper, then it is covered with bubble wrap so that the piece is highly protected. At the end of these two packaging processes, I build a box exclusively for the work, with a very thick cardboard capable of withstanding possible incidents in transport and that the work reaches your hands in perfect condition.

Measurements of the piece: 65x 15 x 12 cm.

Waris Dirie is a Somali model, author, actress and human rights activist in the fight against Female Genital Mutilation. From 1997 to 2003, she was a UN special ambassador against female genital mutilation. In 2002 she founded her own organisation in Vienna, the Desert Flower Foundation.
Dirie was born as one of twelve children into a nomadic family in 1965 in the area of Galkayo. Her first name, Waris, means desert flower. When she was five, she suffered circumcision in the form of infibulation. At the age of thirteen, she fled through the desert to Mogadishu in order to escape an arranged marriage to a 60-year-old man. She first stayed there with relatives, but later she was told that she could not stay any longer because her escape was not tolerated.

One of her uncles, who was then Somali ambassador to the United Kingdom, was looking for a maid. So she was brought to London, where she worked at the Somali embassy without pay. When the uncle had to leave London after the outbreak of the civil war in Somalia, Dirie fled the embassy and lived first in the streets of London, later in a home of the YMCA. She earned her living as a cleaner in a local McDonald's.

Aged 18, Dirie was by chance discovered by photographer Mike Goss, as she stood waiting for her charge outside of his daughter's school. Through getting the children to translate for them, Mike persuaded Waris to model for him. Afterwards, he helped her get a portfolio together and get her representation, although a lot of modelling agencies claimed there was 'no call for black models'. One of her first modelling jobs was for Terence Donovan, who photographed her in 1987 together with the then still unknown model Naomi Campbell for the title of the Pirelli Calendar. From there, Dirie's modeling career took off, she soon became successful model, appearing in advertisements for top brands such as Chanel, Levi's, L'Oréal and Revlon.

In 1987, Dirie played a minor role in the James Bond film The Living Daylights. She also appeared on the runways of London, Milan, Paris and New York, and in fashion magazines such as Elle, Glamour and Vogue. This was followed in 1995 by a BBC documentary entitled A Nomad in New York about her modeling career.

In 1997, at the height of her modeling career, Dirie spoke for the first time with Laura Ziv of the women's magazine Marie Claire about the female genital mutilation  that she had undergone as a child, at the age of five along with her two sisters. That same year, Dirie became a UN envoy for the abolition of FGM. She later paid her mother a visit in her native Somalia.

In 1998, Dirie coauthored her first book along with nonfiction author Cathleen Miller:[4] Desert Flower, an autobiography that went on to become an international bestseller. Over 11 million copies have been sold worldwide to date, 3 million in Germany alone. She later released other successful books including Desert Dawn, Letter to My Mother and Desert Children, the latter of which was launched in tandem with a European campaign against FGM.

In 2002, Dirie founded the Desert Flower Foundation in Vienna. The foundation collects money to raise awareness about the worldwide problem of FGM and to help those affected. In the same year, she received the Corine Literature Prize.

In 2004, she received the World Social Award by Mikhail Gorbachev at the Women's World Award Gala in Hamburg, Germany.[5] Dirie opened the World Conference against FGM in Nairobi, delivered a much-noticed speech and published for the first time the Waris-Dirie Manifesto against FGM. The Austrian Federal President Heinz Fischer awarded her the Romero Prize on behalf of the Austrian Catholic Men's Movement.

In 2006, she addressed the assembled ministers of all EU Member States in Brussels. The European Union then put the fight against female genital mutilation on its agenda, after which laws were tightened up and preventive measures initiated in many European countries.
This work is a tribute to all black women on the planet, especially those who with their courage and decision decided to change the world through their actions and thoughts to make it more just, although many times these lead to retaliation against them and their families.

To send the piece, first the piece is wrapped with a thin layer of acid-free paper, then it is covered with bubble wrap so that the piece is highly protected. At the end of these two packaging processes, I build a box exclusively for the work, with a very thick cardboard capable of withstanding possible incidents in transport and that the work reaches your hands in perfect condition.

Measurements of the piece: 65x 15 x 12 cm.

Waris Dirie is a Somali model, author, actress and human rights activist in the fight against Female Genital Mutilation. From 1997 to 2003, she was a UN special ambassador against female genital mutilation. In 2002 she founded her own organisation in Vienna, the Desert Flower Foundation.
Dirie was born as one of twelve children into a nomadic family in 1965 in the area of Galkayo. Her first name, Waris, means desert flower. When she was five, she suffered circumcision in the form of infibulation. At the age of thirteen, she fled through the desert to Mogadishu in order to escape an arranged marriage to a 60-year-old man. She first stayed there with relatives, but later she was told that she could not stay any longer because her escape was not tolerated.

One of her uncles, who was then Somali ambassador to the United Kingdom, was looking for a maid. So she was brought to London, where she worked at the Somali embassy without pay. When the uncle had to leave London after the outbreak of the civil war in Somalia, Dirie fled the embassy and lived first in the streets of London, later in a home of the YMCA. She earned her living as a cleaner in a local McDonald's.

Aged 18, Dirie was by chance discovered by photographer Mike Goss, as she stood waiting for her charge outside of his daughter's school. Through getting the children to translate for them, Mike persuaded Waris to model for him. Afterwards, he helped her get a portfolio together and get her representation, although a lot of modelling agencies claimed there was 'no call for black models'. One of her first modelling jobs was for Terence Donovan, who photographed her in 1987 together with the then still unknown model Naomi Campbell for the title of the Pirelli Calendar. From there, Dirie's modeling career took off, she soon became successful model, appearing in advertisements for top brands such as Chanel, Levi's, L'Oréal and Revlon.

In 1987, Dirie played a minor role in the James Bond film The Living Daylights. She also appeared on the runways of London, Milan, Paris and New York, and in fashion magazines such as Elle, Glamour and Vogue. This was followed in 1995 by a BBC documentary entitled A Nomad in New York about her modeling career.

In 1997, at the height of her modeling career, Dirie spoke for the first time with Laura Ziv of the women's magazine Marie Claire about the female genital mutilation  that she had undergone as a child, at the age of five along with her two sisters. That same year, Dirie became a UN envoy for the abolition of FGM. She later paid her mother a visit in her native Somalia.

In 1998, Dirie coauthored her first book along with nonfiction author Cathleen Miller:[4] Desert Flower, an autobiography that went on to become an international bestseller. Over 11 million copies have been sold worldwide to date, 3 million in Germany alone. She later released other successful books including Desert Dawn, Letter to My Mother and Desert Children, the latter of which was launched in tandem with a European campaign against FGM.

In 2002, Dirie founded the Desert Flower Foundation in Vienna. The foundation collects money to raise awareness about the worldwide problem of FGM and to help those affected. In the same year, she received the Corine Literature Prize.

In 2004, she received the World Social Award by Mikhail Gorbachev at the Women's World Award Gala in Hamburg, Germany.[5] Dirie opened the World Conference against FGM in Nairobi, delivered a much-noticed speech and published for the first time the Waris-Dirie Manifesto against FGM. The Austrian Federal President Heinz Fischer awarded her the Romero Prize on behalf of the Austrian Catholic Men's Movement.

In 2006, she addressed the assembled ministers of all EU Member States in Brussels. The European Union then put the fight against female genital mutilation on its agenda, after which laws were tightened up and preventive measures initiated in many European countries.
This work is a tribute to all black women on the planet, especially those who with their courage and decision decided to change the world through their actions and thoughts to make it more just, although many times these lead to retaliation against them and their families.

To send the piece, first the piece is wrapped with a thin layer of acid-free paper, then it is covered with bubble wrap so that the piece is highly protected. At the end of these two packaging processes, I build a box exclusively for the work, with a very thick cardboard capable of withstanding possible incidents in transport and that the work reaches your hands in perfect condition.

Measurements of the piece: 65x 15 x 12 cm.

Waris Dirie is a Somali model, author, actress and human rights activist in the fight against Female Genital Mutilation. From 1997 to 2003, she was a UN special ambassador against female genital mutilation. In 2002 she founded her own organisation in Vienna, the Desert Flower Foundation.
Dirie was born as one of twelve children into a nomadic family in 1965 in the area of Galkayo. Her first name, Waris, means desert flower. When she was five, she suffered circumcision in the form of infibulation. At the age of thirteen, she fled through the desert to Mogadishu in order to escape an arranged marriage to a 60-year-old man. She first stayed there with relatives, but later she was told that she could not stay any longer because her escape was not tolerated.

One of her uncles, who was then Somali ambassador to the United Kingdom, was looking for a maid. So she was brought to London, where she worked at the Somali embassy without pay. When the uncle had to leave London after the outbreak of the civil war in Somalia, Dirie fled the embassy and lived first in the streets of London, later in a home of the YMCA. She earned her living as a cleaner in a local McDonald's.

Aged 18, Dirie was by chance discovered by photographer Mike Goss, as she stood waiting for her charge outside of his daughter's school. Through getting the children to translate for them, Mike persuaded Waris to model for him. Afterwards, he helped her get a portfolio together and get her representation, although a lot of modelling agencies claimed there was 'no call for black models'. One of her first modelling jobs was for Terence Donovan, who photographed her in 1987 together with the then still unknown model Naomi Campbell for the title of the Pirelli Calendar. From there, Dirie's modeling career took off, she soon became successful model, appearing in advertisements for top brands such as Chanel, Levi's, L'Oréal and Revlon.

In 1987, Dirie played a minor role in the James Bond film The Living Daylights. She also appeared on the runways of London, Milan, Paris and New York, and in fashion magazines such as Elle, Glamour and Vogue. This was followed in 1995 by a BBC documentary entitled A Nomad in New York about her modeling career.

In 1997, at the height of her modeling career, Dirie spoke for the first time with Laura Ziv of the women's magazine Marie Claire about the female genital mutilation  that she had undergone as a child, at the age of five along with her two sisters. That same year, Dirie became a UN envoy for the abolition of FGM. She later paid her mother a visit in her native Somalia.

In 1998, Dirie coauthored her first book along with nonfiction author Cathleen Miller:[4] Desert Flower, an autobiography that went on to become an international bestseller. Over 11 million copies have been sold worldwide to date, 3 million in Germany alone. She later released other successful books including Desert Dawn, Letter to My Mother and Desert Children, the latter of which was launched in tandem with a European campaign against FGM.

In 2002, Dirie founded the Desert Flower Foundation in Vienna. The foundation collects money to raise awareness about the worldwide problem of FGM and to help those affected. In the same year, she received the Corine Literature Prize.

In 2004, she received the World Social Award by Mikhail Gorbachev at the Women's World Award Gala in Hamburg, Germany.[5] Dirie opened the World Conference against FGM in Nairobi, delivered a much-noticed speech and published for the first time the Waris-Dirie Manifesto against FGM. The Austrian Federal President Heinz Fischer awarded her the Romero Prize on behalf of the Austrian Catholic Men's Movement.

In 2006, she addressed the assembled ministers of all EU Member States in Brussels. The European Union then put the fight against female genital mutilation on its agenda, after which laws were tightened up and preventive measures initiated in many European countries.
This work is a tribute to all black women on the planet, especially those who with their courage and decision decided to change the world through their actions and thoughts to make it more just, although many times these lead to retaliation against them and their families.

To send the piece, first the piece is wrapped with a thin layer of acid-free paper, then it is covered with bubble wrap so that the piece is highly protected. At the end of these two packaging processes, I build a box exclusively for the work, with a very thick cardboard capable of withstanding possible incidents in transport and that the work reaches your hands in perfect condition.

Measurements of the piece: 65x 15 x 12 cm.

Waris Dirie is a Somali model, author, actress and human rights activist in the fight against Female Genital Mutilation. From 1997 to 2003, she was a UN special ambassador against female genital mutilation. In 2002 she founded her own organisation in Vienna, the Desert Flower Foundation.
Dirie was born as one of twelve children into a nomadic family in 1965 in the area of Galkayo. Her first name, Waris, means desert flower. When she was five, she suffered circumcision in the form of infibulation. At the age of thirteen, she fled through the desert to Mogadishu in order to escape an arranged marriage to a 60-year-old man. She first stayed there with relatives, but later she was told that she could not stay any longer because her escape was not tolerated.

One of her uncles, who was then Somali ambassador to the United Kingdom, was looking for a maid. So she was brought to London, where she worked at the Somali embassy without pay. When the uncle had to leave London after the outbreak of the civil war in Somalia, Dirie fled the embassy and lived first in the streets of London, later in a home of the YMCA. She earned her living as a cleaner in a local McDonald's.

Aged 18, Dirie was by chance discovered by photographer Mike Goss, as she stood waiting for her charge outside of his daughter's school. Through getting the children to translate for them, Mike persuaded Waris to model for him. Afterwards, he helped her get a portfolio together and get her representation, although a lot of modelling agencies claimed there was 'no call for black models'. One of her first modelling jobs was for Terence Donovan, who photographed her in 1987 together with the then still unknown model Naomi Campbell for the title of the Pirelli Calendar. From there, Dirie's modeling career took off, she soon became successful model, appearing in advertisements for top brands such as Chanel, Levi's, L'Oréal and Revlon.

In 1987, Dirie played a minor role in the James Bond film The Living Daylights. She also appeared on the runways of London, Milan, Paris and New York, and in fashion magazines such as Elle, Glamour and Vogue. This was followed in 1995 by a BBC documentary entitled A Nomad in New York about her modeling career.

In 1997, at the height of her modeling career, Dirie spoke for the first time with Laura Ziv of the women's magazine Marie Claire about the female genital mutilation  that she had undergone as a child, at the age of five along with her two sisters. That same year, Dirie became a UN envoy for the abolition of FGM. She later paid her mother a visit in her native Somalia.

In 1998, Dirie coauthored her first book along with nonfiction author Cathleen Miller:[4] Desert Flower, an autobiography that went on to become an international bestseller. Over 11 million copies have been sold worldwide to date, 3 million in Germany alone. She later released other successful books including Desert Dawn, Letter to My Mother and Desert Children, the latter of which was launched in tandem with a European campaign against FGM.

In 2002, Dirie founded the Desert Flower Foundation in Vienna. The foundation collects money to raise awareness about the worldwide problem of FGM and to help those affected. In the same year, she received the Corine Literature Prize.

In 2004, she received the World Social Award by Mikhail Gorbachev at the Women's World Award Gala in Hamburg, Germany.[5] Dirie opened the World Conference against FGM in Nairobi, delivered a much-noticed speech and published for the first time the Waris-Dirie Manifesto against FGM. The Austrian Federal President Heinz Fischer awarded her the Romero Prize on behalf of the Austrian Catholic Men's Movement.

In 2006, she addressed the assembled ministers of all EU Member States in Brussels. The European Union then put the fight against female genital mutilation on its agenda, after which laws were tightened up and preventive measures initiated in many European countries.
This work is a tribute to all black women on the planet, especially those who with their courage and decision decided to change the world through their actions and thoughts to make it more just, although many times these lead to retaliation against them and their families.

To send the piece, first the piece is wrapped with a thin layer of acid-free paper, then it is covered with bubble wrap so that the piece is highly protected. At the end of these two packaging processes, I build a box exclusively for the work, with a very thick cardboard capable of withstanding possible incidents in transport and that the work reaches your hands in perfect condition.

Measurements of the piece: 65x 15 x 12 cm.

Waris Dirie is a Somali model, author, actress and human rights activist in the fight against Female Genital Mutilation. From 1997 to 2003, she was a UN special ambassador against female genital mutilation. In 2002 she founded her own organisation in Vienna, the Desert Flower Foundation.
Dirie was born as one of twelve children into a nomadic family in 1965 in the area of Galkayo. Her first name, Waris, means desert flower. When she was five, she suffered circumcision in the form of infibulation. At the age of thirteen, she fled through the desert to Mogadishu in order to escape an arranged marriage to a 60-year-old man. She first stayed there with relatives, but later she was told that she could not stay any longer because her escape was not tolerated.

One of her uncles, who was then Somali ambassador to the United Kingdom, was looking for a maid. So she was brought to London, where she worked at the Somali embassy without pay. When the uncle had to leave London after the outbreak of the civil war in Somalia, Dirie fled the embassy and lived first in the streets of London, later in a home of the YMCA. She earned her living as a cleaner in a local McDonald's.

Aged 18, Dirie was by chance discovered by photographer Mike Goss, as she stood waiting for her charge outside of his daughter's school. Through getting the children to translate for them, Mike persuaded Waris to model for him. Afterwards, he helped her get a portfolio together and get her representation, although a lot of modelling agencies claimed there was 'no call for black models'. One of her first modelling jobs was for Terence Donovan, who photographed her in 1987 together with the then still unknown model Naomi Campbell for the title of the Pirelli Calendar. From there, Dirie's modeling career took off, she soon became successful model, appearing in advertisements for top brands such as Chanel, Levi's, L'Oréal and Revlon.

In 1987, Dirie played a minor role in the James Bond film The Living Daylights. She also appeared on the runways of London, Milan, Paris and New York, and in fashion magazines such as Elle, Glamour and Vogue. This was followed in 1995 by a BBC documentary entitled A Nomad in New York about her modeling career.

In 1997, at the height of her modeling career, Dirie spoke for the first time with Laura Ziv of the women's magazine Marie Claire about the female genital mutilation  that she had undergone as a child, at the age of five along with her two sisters. That same year, Dirie became a UN envoy for the abolition of FGM. She later paid her mother a visit in her native Somalia.

In 1998, Dirie coauthored her first book along with nonfiction author Cathleen Miller:[4] Desert Flower, an autobiography that went on to become an international bestseller. Over 11 million copies have been sold worldwide to date, 3 million in Germany alone. She later released other successful books including Desert Dawn, Letter to My Mother and Desert Children, the latter of which was launched in tandem with a European campaign against FGM.

In 2002, Dirie founded the Desert Flower Foundation in Vienna. The foundation collects money to raise awareness about the worldwide problem of FGM and to help those affected. In the same year, she received the Corine Literature Prize.

In 2004, she received the World Social Award by Mikhail Gorbachev at the Women's World Award Gala in Hamburg, Germany.[5] Dirie opened the World Conference against FGM in Nairobi, delivered a much-noticed speech and published for the first time the Waris-Dirie Manifesto against FGM. The Austrian Federal President Heinz Fischer awarded her the Romero Prize on behalf of the Austrian Catholic Men's Movement.

In 2006, she addressed the assembled ministers of all EU Member States in Brussels. The European Union then put the fight against female genital mutilation on its agenda, after which laws were tightened up and preventive measures initiated in many European countries.
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Black Women - Waris Dirie
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Black Women - Waris Dirie Sculpture

David Sànchez Leòn

Spain

Sculpture, Metal on Iron

Size: 5.9 W x 25.6 H x 4.7 D in

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About The Artwork

This work is a tribute to all black women on the planet, especially those who with their courage and decision decided to change the world through their actions and thoughts to make it more just, although many times these lead to retaliation against them and their families. To send the piece, first the piece is wrapped with a thin layer of acid-free paper, then it is covered with bubble wrap so that the piece is highly protected. At the end of these two packaging processes, I build a box exclusively for the work, with a very thick cardboard capable of withstanding possible incidents in transport and that the work reaches your hands in perfect condition. Measurements of the piece: 65x 15 x 12 cm. Waris Dirie is a Somali model, author, actress and human rights activist in the fight against Female Genital Mutilation. From 1997 to 2003, she was a UN special ambassador against female genital mutilation. In 2002 she founded her own organisation in Vienna, the Desert Flower Foundation. Dirie was born as one of twelve children into a nomadic family in 1965 in the area of Galkayo. Her first name, Waris, means desert flower. When she was five, she suffered circumcision in the form of infibulation. At the age of thirteen, she fled through the desert to Mogadishu in order to escape an arranged marriage to a 60-year-old man. She first stayed there with relatives, but later she was told that she could not stay any longer because her escape was not tolerated. One of her uncles, who was then Somali ambassador to the United Kingdom, was looking for a maid. So she was brought to London, where she worked at the Somali embassy without pay. When the uncle had to leave London after the outbreak of the civil war in Somalia, Dirie fled the embassy and lived first in the streets of London, later in a home of the YMCA. She earned her living as a cleaner in a local McDonald's. Aged 18, Dirie was by chance discovered by photographer Mike Goss, as she stood waiting for her charge outside of his daughter's school. Through getting the children to translate for them, Mike persuaded Waris to model for him. Afterwards, he helped her get a portfolio together and get her representation, although a lot of modelling agencies claimed there was 'no call for black models'. One of her first modelling jobs was for Terence Donovan, who photographed her in 1987 together with the then still unknown model Naomi Campbell for the title of the Pirelli Calendar. From there, Dirie's modeling career took off, she soon became successful model, appearing in advertisements for top brands such as Chanel, Levi's, L'Oréal and Revlon. In 1987, Dirie played a minor role in the James Bond film The Living Daylights. She also appeared on the runways of London, Milan, Paris and New York, and in fashion magazines such as Elle, Glamour and Vogue. This was followed in 1995 by a BBC documentary entitled A Nomad in New York about her modeling career. In 1997, at the height of her modeling career, Dirie spoke for the first time with Laura Ziv of the women's magazine Marie Claire about the female genital mutilation that she had undergone as a child, at the age of five along with her two sisters. That same year, Dirie became a UN envoy for the abolition of FGM. She later paid her mother a visit in her native Somalia. In 1998, Dirie coauthored her first book along with nonfiction author Cathleen Miller:[4] Desert Flower, an autobiography that went on to become an international bestseller. Over 11 million copies have been sold worldwide to date, 3 million in Germany alone. She later released other successful books including Desert Dawn, Letter to My Mother and Desert Children, the latter of which was launched in tandem with a European campaign against FGM. In 2002, Dirie founded the Desert Flower Foundation in Vienna. The foundation collects money to raise awareness about the worldwide problem of FGM and to help those affected. In the same year, she received the Corine Literature Prize. In 2004, she received the World Social Award by Mikhail Gorbachev at the Women's World Award Gala in Hamburg, Germany.[5] Dirie opened the World Conference against FGM in Nairobi, delivered a much-noticed speech and published for the first time the Waris-Dirie Manifesto against FGM. The Austrian Federal President Heinz Fischer awarded her the Romero Prize on behalf of the Austrian Catholic Men's Movement. In 2006, she addressed the assembled ministers of all EU Member States in Brussels. The European Union then put the fight against female genital mutilation on its agenda, after which laws were tightened up and preventive measures initiated in many European countries.

Details & Dimensions

Sculpture:Metal on Iron

Original:One-of-a-kind Artwork

Size:5.9 W x 25.6 H x 4.7 D in

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Delivery Time:Typically 5-7 business days for domestic shipments, 10-14 business days for international shipments.

David Sanchez Leon (Barcelona, 1979), known by the pseudonym of Leon, shapes their work using different techniques that has been refined over the years. Its main project, and that reflects in all his works, is a reflection on humanity, their daily acts and development in their environment. His career is short but intense, with a good track record, having already participated in different competitions of contemporary art, both nationally and internationally, among which are the 17th Open International of sculpture in Venice (Italy), 10th Art Fair contemporary Art Madrid (Palacio de Cibeles, Madrid), or recently in 18951 Km Berlin festival, held on the occasion of the reunification of Germany. Today has different works in private collections spread over three continents.

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