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This piece was made as an antidote to dark times, but also a reminder of the importance of balance, and to embody the lessons of its inhabitants. Wolves and foxes are able to see in the dark (as is the crepuscular female Fox Moth, depicted), thanks to the mother-of-pearl-like retinal night vision retroreflectors in their eyes, called the tapetum lucidum (“clear or illuminated tapestry") that we know of as “eyeshine". 

Lupins stand tall, their name meaning "wolflike". Some say the name is derived from its poisonous nature, known to kill livestock, but some Lupin seeds once transmuted, are also an important food source. They were also named after Wolf, because it was once thought that they ravaged the land on which they grew, but we now know that Lupins actually have a knack for thriving after land devastation and are re-fertilizers. They are capable, with the help of their root bacteria, to pull nutrients from thin air, so the devastated, fallow landscapes populated by the plant are in fact not the aftermath of their presence, but their endeavor to see themselves through the dark times and to embody the strength to persist and recover after trauma. On the other hand, if balance is totally thwarted, Lupin is capable of becoming invasive and even quick to spread disease throughout its tight pack community.

In some folklore, Wolf represents the Night, consuming the stars and the Day bird, and thought to embody Time itself. One wouldn't be surprised then that wolves are ruled by Saturn (and Venus: think fertility, Romulus and Remus, resources, relationships, co-operation, values, courtship, aesthetics, sociability). Wolves are known to be solitary, while also social and co-operative. Wolf knows the path through the dark forest and has been associated with the Underworld as conductor of souls and encourages us to find our unbreakable kernels of strength and courage.    

Foxglove is also a symbol of fertility, ruled by Venus. The Goddess Flora showed Hera (or Juno) how to impregnate herself by touching Foxglove to her belly and her breasts, giving birth to Mars (or Vulcan in some sources), becoming a powerful symbol for Midwives and creativity, a generative symbol as well as a plant dedicated to fairy magic (Folksglove). Another poison plant, Foxglove can be deadly but also strong hedgerow Heart medicine. (It's thought that Van Gogh's yellow period may have been influenced by his use of digitalis for treatment of epilepsy - blue halos around yellows/greens, and his two portraits of his doctor both have stems of Foxglove.). This wayside flower asks us to kickstart our hearts and may we be reminded to grow tall, but tread lightly.  

Multiple sarcophilous or corpse seeking mushrooms are included, ghoul fungus, fairy cakes, sustaining life by transforming what was lost. Also included are Lycoperdon mushrooms, the ubiquitous edible gems that eventually turn to puffers of spores, (“Lyko”-wolf, “perdon” to break wind), because how could I not include a greek wolf-fart joke.

May we look forward to social and cooperative times ahead and champion this period of transmuting darkness as part of our collective "illuminated tapestry" to flourish after devastation and to leave our soil healthier than it was before (and also a big shoutout to Canis lupus familiaris, for being such shining pandemic lights, especially to my boy Akio whose name so aptly mean "bright boy").
This piece was made as an antidote to dark times, but also a reminder of the importance of balance, and to embody the lessons of its inhabitants. Wolves and foxes are able to see in the dark (as is the crepuscular female Fox Moth, depicted), thanks to the mother-of-pearl-like retinal night vision retroreflectors in their eyes, called the tapetum lucidum (“clear or illuminated tapestry") that we know of as “eyeshine". 

Lupins stand tall, their name meaning "wolflike". Some say the name is derived from its poisonous nature, known to kill livestock, but some Lupin seeds once transmuted, are also an important food source. They were also named after Wolf, because it was once thought that they ravaged the land on which they grew, but we now know that Lupins actually have a knack for thriving after land devastation and are re-fertilizers. They are capable, with the help of their root bacteria, to pull nutrients from thin air, so the devastated, fallow landscapes populated by the plant are in fact not the aftermath of their presence, but their endeavor to see themselves through the dark times and to embody the strength to persist and recover after trauma. On the other hand, if balance is totally thwarted, Lupin is capable of becoming invasive and even quick to spread disease throughout its tight pack community.

In some folklore, Wolf represents the Night, consuming the stars and the Day bird, and thought to embody Time itself. One wouldn't be surprised then that wolves are ruled by Saturn (and Venus: think fertility, Romulus and Remus, resources, relationships, co-operation, values, courtship, aesthetics, sociability). Wolves are known to be solitary, while also social and co-operative. Wolf knows the path through the dark forest and has been associated with the Underworld as conductor of souls and encourages us to find our unbreakable kernels of strength and courage.    

Foxglove is also a symbol of fertility, ruled by Venus. The Goddess Flora showed Hera (or Juno) how to impregnate herself by touching Foxglove to her belly and her breasts, giving birth to Mars (or Vulcan in some sources), becoming a powerful symbol for Midwives and creativity, a generative symbol as well as a plant dedicated to fairy magic (Folksglove). Another poison plant, Foxglove can be deadly but also strong hedgerow Heart medicine. (It's thought that Van Gogh's yellow period may have been influenced by his use of digitalis for treatment of epilepsy - blue halos around yellows/greens, and his two portraits of his doctor both have stems of Foxglove.). This wayside flower asks us to kickstart our hearts and may we be reminded to grow tall, but tread lightly.  

Multiple sarcophilous or corpse seeking mushrooms are included, ghoul fungus, fairy cakes, sustaining life by transforming what was lost. Also included are Lycoperdon mushrooms, the ubiquitous edible gems that eventually turn to puffers of spores, (“Lyko”-wolf, “perdon” to break wind), because how could I not include a greek wolf-fart joke.

May we look forward to social and cooperative times ahead and champion this period of transmuting darkness as part of our collective "illuminated tapestry" to flourish after devastation and to leave our soil healthier than it was before (and also a big shoutout to Canis lupus familiaris, for being such shining pandemic lights, especially to my boy Akio whose name so aptly mean "bright boy").
This piece was made as an antidote to dark times, but also a reminder of the importance of balance, and to embody the lessons of its inhabitants. Wolves and foxes are able to see in the dark (as is the crepuscular female Fox Moth, depicted), thanks to the mother-of-pearl-like retinal night vision retroreflectors in their eyes, called the tapetum lucidum (“clear or illuminated tapestry") that we know of as “eyeshine". 

Lupins stand tall, their name meaning "wolflike". Some say the name is derived from its poisonous nature, known to kill livestock, but some Lupin seeds once transmuted, are also an important food source. They were also named after Wolf, because it was once thought that they ravaged the land on which they grew, but we now know that Lupins actually have a knack for thriving after land devastation and are re-fertilizers. They are capable, with the help of their root bacteria, to pull nutrients from thin air, so the devastated, fallow landscapes populated by the plant are in fact not the aftermath of their presence, but their endeavor to see themselves through the dark times and to embody the strength to persist and recover after trauma. On the other hand, if balance is totally thwarted, Lupin is capable of becoming invasive and even quick to spread disease throughout its tight pack community.

In some folklore, Wolf represents the Night, consuming the stars and the Day bird, and thought to embody Time itself. One wouldn't be surprised then that wolves are ruled by Saturn (and Venus: think fertility, Romulus and Remus, resources, relationships, co-operation, values, courtship, aesthetics, sociability). Wolves are known to be solitary, while also social and co-operative. Wolf knows the path through the dark forest and has been associated with the Underworld as conductor of souls and encourages us to find our unbreakable kernels of strength and courage.    

Foxglove is also a symbol of fertility, ruled by Venus. The Goddess Flora showed Hera (or Juno) how to impregnate herself by touching Foxglove to her belly and her breasts, giving birth to Mars (or Vulcan in some sources), becoming a powerful symbol for Midwives and creativity, a generative symbol as well as a plant dedicated to fairy magic (Folksglove). Another poison plant, Foxglove can be deadly but also strong hedgerow Heart medicine. (It's thought that Van Gogh's yellow period may have been influenced by his use of digitalis for treatment of epilepsy - blue halos around yellows/greens, and his two portraits of his doctor both have stems of Foxglove.). This wayside flower asks us to kickstart our hearts and may we be reminded to grow tall, but tread lightly.  

Multiple sarcophilous or corpse seeking mushrooms are included, ghoul fungus, fairy cakes, sustaining life by transforming what was lost. Also included are Lycoperdon mushrooms, the ubiquitous edible gems that eventually turn to puffers of spores, (“Lyko”-wolf, “perdon” to break wind), because how could I not include a greek wolf-fart joke.

May we look forward to social and cooperative times ahead and champion this period of transmuting darkness as part of our collective "illuminated tapestry" to flourish after devastation and to leave our soil healthier than it was before (and also a big shoutout to Canis lupus familiaris, for being such shining pandemic lights, especially to my boy Akio whose name so aptly mean "bright boy").
This piece was made as an antidote to dark times, but also a reminder of the importance of balance, and to embody the lessons of its inhabitants. Wolves and foxes are able to see in the dark (as is the crepuscular female Fox Moth, depicted), thanks to the mother-of-pearl-like retinal night vision retroreflectors in their eyes, called the tapetum lucidum (“clear or illuminated tapestry") that we know of as “eyeshine". 

Lupins stand tall, their name meaning "wolflike". Some say the name is derived from its poisonous nature, known to kill livestock, but some Lupin seeds once transmuted, are also an important food source. They were also named after Wolf, because it was once thought that they ravaged the land on which they grew, but we now know that Lupins actually have a knack for thriving after land devastation and are re-fertilizers. They are capable, with the help of their root bacteria, to pull nutrients from thin air, so the devastated, fallow landscapes populated by the plant are in fact not the aftermath of their presence, but their endeavor to see themselves through the dark times and to embody the strength to persist and recover after trauma. On the other hand, if balance is totally thwarted, Lupin is capable of becoming invasive and even quick to spread disease throughout its tight pack community.

In some folklore, Wolf represents the Night, consuming the stars and the Day bird, and thought to embody Time itself. One wouldn't be surprised then that wolves are ruled by Saturn (and Venus: think fertility, Romulus and Remus, resources, relationships, co-operation, values, courtship, aesthetics, sociability). Wolves are known to be solitary, while also social and co-operative. Wolf knows the path through the dark forest and has been associated with the Underworld as conductor of souls and encourages us to find our unbreakable kernels of strength and courage.    

Foxglove is also a symbol of fertility, ruled by Venus. The Goddess Flora showed Hera (or Juno) how to impregnate herself by touching Foxglove to her belly and her breasts, giving birth to Mars (or Vulcan in some sources), becoming a powerful symbol for Midwives and creativity, a generative symbol as well as a plant dedicated to fairy magic (Folksglove). Another poison plant, Foxglove can be deadly but also strong hedgerow Heart medicine. (It's thought that Van Gogh's yellow period may have been influenced by his use of digitalis for treatment of epilepsy - blue halos around yellows/greens, and his two portraits of his doctor both have stems of Foxglove.). This wayside flower asks us to kickstart our hearts and may we be reminded to grow tall, but tread lightly.  

Multiple sarcophilous or corpse seeking mushrooms are included, ghoul fungus, fairy cakes, sustaining life by transforming what was lost. Also included are Lycoperdon mushrooms, the ubiquitous edible gems that eventually turn to puffers of spores, (“Lyko”-wolf, “perdon” to break wind), because how could I not include a greek wolf-fart joke.

May we look forward to social and cooperative times ahead and champion this period of transmuting darkness as part of our collective "illuminated tapestry" to flourish after devastation and to leave our soil healthier than it was before (and also a big shoutout to Canis lupus familiaris, for being such shining pandemic lights, especially to my boy Akio whose name so aptly mean "bright boy").
This piece was made as an antidote to dark times, but also a reminder of the importance of balance, and to embody the lessons of its inhabitants. Wolves and foxes are able to see in the dark (as is the crepuscular female Fox Moth, depicted), thanks to the mother-of-pearl-like retinal night vision retroreflectors in their eyes, called the tapetum lucidum (“clear or illuminated tapestry") that we know of as “eyeshine". 

Lupins stand tall, their name meaning "wolflike". Some say the name is derived from its poisonous nature, known to kill livestock, but some Lupin seeds once transmuted, are also an important food source. They were also named after Wolf, because it was once thought that they ravaged the land on which they grew, but we now know that Lupins actually have a knack for thriving after land devastation and are re-fertilizers. They are capable, with the help of their root bacteria, to pull nutrients from thin air, so the devastated, fallow landscapes populated by the plant are in fact not the aftermath of their presence, but their endeavor to see themselves through the dark times and to embody the strength to persist and recover after trauma. On the other hand, if balance is totally thwarted, Lupin is capable of becoming invasive and even quick to spread disease throughout its tight pack community.

In some folklore, Wolf represents the Night, consuming the stars and the Day bird, and thought to embody Time itself. One wouldn't be surprised then that wolves are ruled by Saturn (and Venus: think fertility, Romulus and Remus, resources, relationships, co-operation, values, courtship, aesthetics, sociability). Wolves are known to be solitary, while also social and co-operative. Wolf knows the path through the dark forest and has been associated with the Underworld as conductor of souls and encourages us to find our unbreakable kernels of strength and courage.    

Foxglove is also a symbol of fertility, ruled by Venus. The Goddess Flora showed Hera (or Juno) how to impregnate herself by touching Foxglove to her belly and her breasts, giving birth to Mars (or Vulcan in some sources), becoming a powerful symbol for Midwives and creativity, a generative symbol as well as a plant dedicated to fairy magic (Folksglove). Another poison plant, Foxglove can be deadly but also strong hedgerow Heart medicine. (It's thought that Van Gogh's yellow period may have been influenced by his use of digitalis for treatment of epilepsy - blue halos around yellows/greens, and his two portraits of his doctor both have stems of Foxglove.). This wayside flower asks us to kickstart our hearts and may we be reminded to grow tall, but tread lightly.  

Multiple sarcophilous or corpse seeking mushrooms are included, ghoul fungus, fairy cakes, sustaining life by transforming what was lost. Also included are Lycoperdon mushrooms, the ubiquitous edible gems that eventually turn to puffers of spores, (“Lyko”-wolf, “perdon” to break wind), because how could I not include a greek wolf-fart joke.

May we look forward to social and cooperative times ahead and champion this period of transmuting darkness as part of our collective "illuminated tapestry" to flourish after devastation and to leave our soil healthier than it was before (and also a big shoutout to Canis lupus familiaris, for being such shining pandemic lights, especially to my boy Akio whose name so aptly mean "bright boy").
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Tapetum Lucidum. Sculpture

Lana Filippone

Canada

Sculpture, Ceramic on Other

Size: 20 W x 24 H x 8 D in

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About The Artwork

This piece was made as an antidote to dark times, but also a reminder of the importance of balance, and to embody the lessons of its inhabitants. Wolves and foxes are able to see in the dark (as is the crepuscular female Fox Moth, depicted), thanks to the mother-of-pearl-like retinal night vision retroreflectors in their eyes, called the tapetum lucidum (“clear or illuminated tapestry") that we know of as “eyeshine". Lupins stand tall, their name meaning "wolflike". Some say the name is derived from its poisonous nature, known to kill livestock, but some Lupin seeds once transmuted, are also an important food source. They were also named after Wolf, because it was once thought that they ravaged the land on which they grew, but we now know that Lupins actually have a knack for thriving after land devastation and are re-fertilizers. They are capable, with the help of their root bacteria, to pull nutrients from thin air, so the devastated, fallow landscapes populated by the plant are in fact not the aftermath of their presence, but their endeavor to see themselves through the dark times and to embody the strength to persist and recover after trauma. On the other hand, if balance is totally thwarted, Lupin is capable of becoming invasive and even quick to spread disease throughout its tight pack community. In some folklore, Wolf represents the Night, consuming the stars and the Day bird, and thought to embody Time itself. One wouldn't be surprised then that wolves are ruled by Saturn (and Venus: think fertility, Romulus and Remus, resources, relationships, co-operation, values, courtship, aesthetics, sociability). Wolves are known to be solitary, while also social and co-operative. Wolf knows the path through the dark forest and has been associated with the Underworld as conductor of souls and encourages us to find our unbreakable kernels of strength and courage.   Foxglove is also a symbol of fertility, ruled by Venus. The Goddess Flora showed Hera (or Juno) how to impregnate herself by touching Foxglove to her belly and her breasts, giving birth to Mars (or Vulcan in some sources), becoming a powerful symbol for Midwives and creativity, a generative symbol as well as a plant dedicated to fairy magic (Folksglove). Another poison plant, Foxglove can be deadly but also strong hedgerow Heart medicine. (It's thought that Van Gogh's yellow period may have been influenced by his use of digitalis for treatment of epilepsy - blue halos around yellows/greens, and his two portraits of his doctor both have stems of Foxglove.). This wayside flower asks us to kickstart our hearts and may we be reminded to grow tall, but tread lightly.  Multiple sarcophilous or corpse seeking mushrooms are included, ghoul fungus, fairy cakes, sustaining life by transforming what was lost. Also included are Lycoperdon mushrooms, the ubiquitous edible gems that eventually turn to puffers of spores, (“Lyko”-wolf, “perdon” to break wind), because how could I not include a greek wolf-fart joke. May we look forward to social and cooperative times ahead and champion this period of transmuting darkness as part of our collective "illuminated tapestry" to flourish after devastation and to leave our soil healthier than it was before (and also a big shoutout to Canis lupus familiaris, for being such shining pandemic lights, especially to my boy Akio whose name so aptly mean "bright boy").

Details & Dimensions

Sculpture:Ceramic on Other

Original:One-of-a-kind Artwork

Size:20 W x 24 H x 8 D in

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