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Install shot at the gallery
Me and the painting in the studio
Nadia Jaber’s paintings jump around, scrolling between textures, flipping tabs into new color palettes and stretching materiality. She riffs between styles and ideas, cutting and scratching them like a DJ would, to curate something entirely new. The eyes and mind can keep up of course, because we’re used to this hyperactive image intake - we do it all day, everyday on our phones. “about:blank” is Nadia’s series reflecting not just on our visual ADHD but on what the mysterious machines behind social media are making us want, or think we want, and what that means for art appreciation. How about the artist as a postdigitalist algorithm, an online magpie curating a found line, shape, and color to generate an analogue version of the digital stream of information. Nadia’s work is a full-scale rebellion against the smoke and mirrors of social media, the artwork makes the virtual vibrant. Nadia takes an old-fashioned needle and neatly sews it all together. The work is generative in that it’s a remix of some other artworks. Its narrative structure is set up to tell a new story every time you see it, depending on where you start.

102 Processing 
The title is a response code used to inform the client that the server has accepted the complete request, but has not yet completed it. This status code should only be sent when the server has a reasonable expectation that the request will take significant time to complete. 
The words in the upper part of the painting read backwards “I WILL WIN”, and this artwork is a mixture of 5 abstract paintings and illustration elements that symbolize nature. The neon light thunder is set to express an urgent feeling of energy as nothing moves faster than light. 
The link between the painting and the title code "102 Processing" refers to the idea of the journey during a process and the expectation of the final output. The reason why the letters “I WILL WIN” read backwards is to express the expectation of a positive outcome in every process but since it is still not complete, it is not 100% sure it will be a positive one. 

The title of the artworks comes from HTTP status response codes. The codes are standard response codes given by website servers and are sometimes called internet error codes. Naming the paintings with these codes I wanted to create a bond between them and the conceptualization of these series. As the code that titles these series “about:blank” displays a blank page when the browser has nothing else to show, the title of each painting is named after a different response code given by a website when an error happens.

Painting composed of 6 different canvases sewed together. Painted on the sides, so no need to frame it. Signed at the back of the painting, and delivered stretched and ready to hang.
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102 Processing
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102 Processing Painting

Nadia Jaber

Spain

Painting, Acrylic on Canvas

Size: 55 W x 63 H x 1.3 D in

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Artist Recognition

link - Artist featured in a collection

Artist featured in a collection

link - Featured in the Catalog

Featured in the Catalog

link - Showed at the The Other Art Fair

Showed at the The Other Art Fair

About The Artwork

Nadia Jaber’s paintings jump around, scrolling between textures, flipping tabs into new color palettes and stretching materiality. She riffs between styles and ideas, cutting and scratching them like a DJ would, to curate something entirely new. The eyes and mind can keep up of course, because we’re used to this hyperactive image intake - we do it all day, everyday on our phones. “about:blank” is Nadia’s series reflecting not just on our visual ADHD but on what the mysterious machines behind social media are making us want, or think we want, and what that means for art appreciation. How about the artist as a postdigitalist algorithm, an online magpie curating a found line, shape, and color to generate an analogue version of the digital stream of information. Nadia’s work is a full-scale rebellion against the smoke and mirrors of social media, the artwork makes the virtual vibrant. Nadia takes an old-fashioned needle and neatly sews it all together. The work is generative in that it’s a remix of some other artworks. Its narrative structure is set up to tell a new story every time you see it, depending on where you start. 102 Processing The title is a response code used to inform the client that the server has accepted the complete request, but has not yet completed it. This status code should only be sent when the server has a reasonable expectation that the request will take significant time to complete. The words in the upper part of the painting read backwards “I WILL WIN”, and this artwork is a mixture of 5 abstract paintings and illustration elements that symbolize nature. The neon light thunder is set to express an urgent feeling of energy as nothing moves faster than light. The link between the painting and the title code "102 Processing" refers to the idea of the journey during a process and the expectation of the final output. The reason why the letters “I WILL WIN” read backwards is to express the expectation of a positive outcome in every process but since it is still not complete, it is not 100% sure it will be a positive one. The title of the artworks comes from HTTP status response codes. The codes are standard response codes given by website servers and are sometimes called internet error codes. Naming the paintings with these codes I wanted to create a bond between them and the conceptualization of these series. As the code that titles these series “about:blank” displays a blank page when the browser has nothing else to show, the title of each painting is named after a different response code given by a website when an error happens. Painting composed of 6 different canvases sewed together. Painted on the sides, so no need to frame it. Signed at the back of the painting, and delivered stretched and ready to hang.

Details & Dimensions

Painting:Acrylic on Canvas

Original:One-of-a-kind Artwork

Size:55 W x 63 H x 1.3 D in

Shipping & Returns

Delivery Time:Typically 5-7 business days for domestic shipments, 10-14 business days for international shipments.

Artist Nadia Jaber (Spanish, b. 1986) channels the artist as a postdigital algorithm, an online magpie curating a found line, shape, and color to generate an analog version of the digital stream of information. Nadia’s work reflects not just on our visual ADHD but on what the mysterious machines behind social media are making us want, or think we want, and what that means for art appreciation. Her work has been featured in “15 Emerging Female Artists To Invest in Before They Blow Up” selected by Saatchi Art Head Curator Rebecca Wilson, and her paintings have been included in interior design projects featured in AD Spain Magazine. She has participated in the Other Art Fair by Saatchi Art in NY and had a solo show in LA. Also had participated in Art Fairs in Madrid and Mallorca. Nadia Jaber’s paintings jump around, scrolling between textures, flipping tabs into new color palettes and stretching materiality. She riffs between styles and ideas, cutting and scratching them like a DJ would, to curate something entirely new. The eyes and mind can keep up of course, because we’re used to this hyperactive image intake - we do it all day, every day on our phones. Nadia’s work is a full-scale rebellion against the smoke and mirrors of social media, the ultimate collage of the current algorithmic syncretism and acknowledges not only Nadia’s belonging to the digital art revolution, but points rather gratefully to Art’s ultimate dimension, its digital kingdom, where artists thrive, collect, exchange, buy, sell, and perhaps, more definitely, find inspiration and half live. Nobody with their wits about them would question that the art world is increasingly virtual and that its health hasn’t been better in decades. So the question here prays: are technologies to blame or to praise? Andy Warhol, one of the most accomplished ambassadors of appropriation, was ecstatic after discovering the wonders of silk-screening. In one of the fewest interviews available online —omnipotent technology in full bloom— Warhol told to Art News’s reporter Gene Swenson a rather legendary line: «I think everybody should be a machine. I think everybody should like everybody». It was 1962. Warhol anticipated not only the behavior of today’s technologies but the ultimate lust of artists like Nadia, who are openly challenging themselves to become precisely that same technology.

Artist Recognition

Artist featured in a collection

Artist featured by Saatchi Art in a collection

Featured in the Catalog

Featured in Saatchi Art's printed catalog, sent to thousands of art collectors

Showed at the The Other Art Fair

Handpicked to show at The Other Art Fair presented by Saatchi Art in Brooklyn, Brooklyn, Los Angeles

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